Email Marketers Peer Into Your Inbox

Email marketers can now peer into your inbox to see whether their emails are getting through.

ExactTarget, an Indianopolis-based company that “delivers on-demand email software solutions for permission- based email marketing” to companies like The Home Depot, General Mills, Scotts and Bristol-Myers Squibb is now offering a service that peers into users’ inboxes at their local ISP to check whether their email marketing newsletters are getting through or getting binned as spam. The product: Inbox Detective.

According to ExactTarget, more than 20 percent of legitimate email never gets through spam filters — numbers, as Chris Baggott, co-founder and chief marketing officer of ExactTarget puts it, that “should be unacceptable to a marketer.”

The ExactTarget Inbox Detective, allows marketers “to peer into the Inbox at the top 21 ISPs to get a quick snapshot of their actual delivery rates”. From there marketers can “track what percentage of email is reaching the inbox, which are being redirected to the bulk folder and which are being discarded.” All this can be done “in real-time, so problem areas can be identified and adjustments can be made.”

Another thing the Inbox Detective does is “keep emails away from content filters, which are the most widely used spam prevention technique, and also often erroneously catch legitimate permission email”. This it does by analysing “email content against major spam filters and black lists before sending”, so the marketer can “receive real-time advice on what content changes are needed to maximize email delivery”.

While I can quite understand that there are lots of legitimate email marketing companies out there, and lots of companies trying to run legitimate email newsletters, the Inbox Detective, as described in the ExactTarget press release, raises some troubling questions about the privacy of users’ inboxes at their ISP.

And, if ExactTarget can peer into inboxes of email providers such as Gmail, AOL, Yahoo, Hotmail, MSN, Earthlink, Comcast, AT&T and RoadRunner, who else might be able to?

RSSpam, And The End Of A Medium’s Innocence

Will spam kill off RSS?

I’m a bit late spotting this, but I noticed today that Moreover’s RSS feeds contain a lot of ads. 2RSS.com noticed the same thing about a month ago. In fact there’s already been quite a discussion about the phenomenon, since not only Moreover does it. Indeed, there’s some talk that Blogger is actually inserting ads into the news feeds of its users.

What’s worrying is that all this is going on without much thought towards — or the consent of — the end-user. Moreover’s feeds, for example, not only include no AD: prefix that may help the user get a sense of what is actually part of the feed and what is RSSpam, but they also configure the spam so that every time you update your feed — or your RSS reader does it for you — the same piece of spam will pop up. This means, as this example from the Jason Murphy Show illustrates, large quantities of spam per valid item.

All this shows a lack of thought and consideration for what is still a very new medium. If you want to kill off RSS, Moreover has the answer. Of course, there’s also the need for these guys to make money. But this is not the way to do it. Ads are better served within the content, so that, for example, if you click on the item itself so that the full content loads, the ad itself will appear along with the content.

Another point: Folk argue whether ads included in RSS feeds are spam or not. I say anything that’s sent to you without you agreeing to it is spam. (I don’t recall agreeing to it when I included the Moreover RSS feed in my reader, although I’m willing to stand corrected. The only time I’ve had to click on something to acknowledge the existence of a user agreement was with the Telegraph feeds.) Folks need to be consulted before they sign up for a feed that it includes spam.

The bottom line here is that this grapeshot approach to ads in RSS feeds endangers the medium before it’s taken off. Apple are including RSS in a very interesting and imaginative way in their new OS but there aren’t going to be many takers if feeds are polluted by too many ads that aren’t even contextual (I noticed ads for free golf clubs and microdermabrasion, whatever that is, in my Moreover feed on East Timor news). Keep pulling that stunt, Moreover, and you’ll lose everyone’s interest very quickly. RSS was supposed to be the answer to mailboxes full of rubbish, not an alternative means of delivering that rubbish.