Directory Of Clipping Savers

Update Nov 7 2006: A new kid on the block for Firefox 2.0 users: Zotero. (Thanks, Charles)

I recently wrote in WSJ.com (subscription required) about how to save snippets of information while you’re browsing. I didn’t have space to mention all the options I — or readers — came across, so here’s the beginnings of a list. Please feel free to let me know about more: The basic criterion is that the service lets the user easily capture material they’ve found on the Internet (for stuff that’s more socially oriented, check out my Directory of Social Annotation Tools).

  • Zotero. It not only does a great job of storing globs of web pages or the whole thing but it has an academic bent too, allowing you to store bibiographic information too.
  • ContentSaver:   is both a browser add-in and an Office-style application at the same time: With the additional toolbar and the extended shortcut menus in the browser, you can easily gather material during your Internet research. 35 EUR (Thanks, Ganesh)
  • eSnips:    Save real web content not just links: relevant paragraphs and images you find on any web site….oh yes, and links too. 1GB free
  • wists.com: The idea is to bridge the gap between blogging and bookmarking. It aims to make simple list blogging as easy as bookmarking and make bookmarking take advantages of weblog publishing, with automatic thumbnail image creation etc. (David Galbraith)
  • Net Snippets: The friendly, intuitive way to maximize the effective use of information from the Internet and online research
  • Jeteye: enables users to create, send, view and share any type of online content, add notes and annotations and save it all in user organized Jetpaks™ through an easy drag and drop interface.
  • Google Notebook: makes web research of all kinds – from planning a vacation to researching a school paper to buying a car – easier and more efficient by enabling you to clip and gather information even while you’re browsing the web.
  • ClipMate: ClipMate saves time and makes you more productive by adding clipboard functions that the Windows clipboard leaves out – starting with the ability to hold thousands of “clips”, instead of just one. ($35)
  • Clipmarks: Clip and tag anything on the web
  • Onfolio: a PC application for collection, organizing and sharing information you find online. ($30 to $150)
  • EverNoteQuickly create, organize and find any type of notes on an endless, digital roll of paper. (from free to $35)
  • ScrapBook: a Firefox extension which helps you to save Web pages and easily manage collections. Key features are lightness, speed, accuracy and multi-language support.
  • Omea Reader: Free and easy to use RSS reader, NNTP news reader, and web bookmark manager. It’s fast, it aggregates, and it keeps you organized.

My personal favorites? I love ScrapBook because it lets me save stuff in folders on my own computer. Clipmarks is great for online stuff, and the tagging/folder mix is powerful. EverNote has its moments but for all its interface ingenuity, it’s not easy to organise stuff.

An Opera whinge:

Some readers have pointed to Opera’s ‘Notes’ (Flash Demo) function which is neat, but doesn’t do as much as ScrapBook (there’s also a Firefox extension called QuickNote which performs more or less the same tricks as the Opera Notes. And besides, I’m still mad at Opera for not supporting drag and drop. What is it with them?  (Sad to say that, because I think Opera have been great in improving interface design. But I think they’ve dropped the ball. Back in February 2003 I was wowed (WSJ.com link; subscription only, I’m afraid) I wrote:

Just when I thought software had become as innovative as a bacon sandwich, something came along to prove me wrong. There is software out there that is innovative and that actually makes things easier. It’s a Web browser made by a Norwegian company called Opera Software ASA and its latest incarnation, released last month, is a real gem.

Of course, that was before Firefox came along and stole my heart.

30. January 2006 by jeremy
Categories: Internet life, Resources, Software, apps | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 11 comments

Comments (11)

  1. You don’t have it listed, but Bloglines has clipping functionality as well. I prefer online storage since I move between computers.
    I used to use a firefox extension called text marker, which saves the clip in different colours with a URL citation. Unfortunately, it doesn’t work with Ff 1.5.

  2. For Yahoo users, there’s a easy way to save the clipping to the Yahoo Notes page.

    http://saraswaticlasses.net/sites/links4.php

    1) Click and drag the !note link to your links toolbar.
    2) Select any text on the webpage and click on the !note

  3. What about Delicious?

  4. Al, I don’t see del.icio.us as a clipping service. To me there’s a distinction between bookmarking — social or otherwise — and clip saving. Although it’s true that Clipmarks blur the distinction a tad.

  5. Wish to mention about “Contentsaver” which I have been using for the past 1 year.

    Great software updated almost on weekly basis nowadays.

    I would rate Contentsaver as one of the frontrunners in offline web-page saving tools

  6. I have been using a program called Omea Reader by JetBrains. I use it primarily for a feed and newsgroup reader. It also has a clipping feature. Omea Reader is free while Omea Pro is not, but offers a ton of features. Take a look at http://www.jetbrains.com/omea/reader/index.html

  7. I use diigo, it’s quite cool for clipping snippets and you can annotate and exchange annotations too.

  8. that’s a nice little list of some cool widgets right there. I’ve been using Firefox 2.0, and actually have found it to be more resource exhaustive than most other browsers…

  9. Hi,
    I have been using Surfulater for the past year and it is positively outstanding. The development team has garnered well deserved press for it as well (including The WSJ). The interface is very uncluttered and it does what what it is supposed to do beautifully.

  10. Hmmm Social Bookmarking made difficult is what this should be called. What’s wrong with finding information you like and bookmarking the site?

  11. Good list!! Thanks.