Tag Archives: Opera

Google, browsers and the illusion of choice

By | July 9, 2020

It’s Google’s world, which means we’re always leaking data to them. Some of us assiduously search for other options. But it’s not easy. Two reasons: We don’t have a firm grasp of the size of the elephant we’re confronting, and secondly, we don’t really understand what we’re doing when we’re online. What data are we leaking, and how,… Read More »

The Browser Doesn’t Matter So Long As It Goes to Google

By | December 25, 2011

The whole Google/Firefox issue is an interesting one: Google is the default search engine in Firefox because it pays to be there. The three-year deal expired in November 2011. Would they renew? Some thought no. They were wrong. Not only has Google renewed the deal whereby it effectively bankrolls Firefox, but it’s the first time that it’s continued… Read More »

Southeast Asia’s Third Mobile Tier

By | August 31, 2011

The mobile revolution is moving from second tier countries in Southeast Asia to the third and final tier. Whereas previously Indonesia and the Philippines were seeing the biggest growth in mobile Internet traffic, now it’s Burma (Myanmar) and Cambodia which top the list in terms of user- and usage-growth, according to the Opera State of the Mobile Web… Read More »

Libya: We’re Back. Iran: We’re Not

By | August 31, 2011

In its latest quarterly report Opera looks a how quickly Libyans have gone back online with their mobile devices after six months in the dark. The graphic pretty much sums it up: Talking of Internet blocking, Opera noticed that Iran continues to mess with Internet access for its citizens: While we can speculate on government intervention or an… Read More »

The Browser Wars: Another Milestone

By | May 11, 2010

(This is a copy of my Loose Wire Sevice column, produced for newspapers and other print publications. Hence lack of links) By Jeremy Wagstaff As you know, I’m into milestones, and another one has been passed in recent days: Microsoft’s market share of browsers is down below 60%. Now this may not sound very exciting to you, but… Read More »