Tag Archives: International Herald Tribune

Newspapers’ Challenge

Newspapers have been scrambling to keep up with the world of blogs. In the process they’re actually destroying what sets them apart.

Take this piece from the International Herald Tribune. It’s in this morning’s revamped paper, under the byline of John Doyle—without further affiliation. It’s a good piece, except for a lame ending, but it contains at least four grammatical or spelling errors:

  • “the Scotland” twice (“Darren Fletcher was the Scotland’s best player”)
  • “England, under am Italian manager”
  • “There is a poetry of national longing and a poetic justice being behind the success of the Celtic countries.” Good luck making sense of that.

Now I just put this down to poor subbing. But the problem isn’t that.

The problem is that this piece is actually a blog post. Written by someone who doesn’t work for the NYT/IHT, as far as I can work out. At the bottom of the online version is this:

John Doyle is the TV Columnist for the Globe and Mail in Canada, writes regularly about soccer and his book about soccer, All The Rambling Boys of Pleasure, will be published in 2010.

So, first problem is: does a blog post count as a news article that can be published in a paper as such? And should the reader not be informed that

  • it’s a blog post, not a news piece (or analysis)
  • and that the author isn’t actually a NYT scribe?

The editing is not good, but it’s actually OK if it were a blog post, because it can be updated. Indeed, the online version has been: It’s longer, it makes sense, and the grammatical and spelling errors have gone. Indeed there’s a correction there that signifies the evolving nature of online writing.

My point is this: I paid for this newspaper. I thought I was paying for something that reflected the best of the IHT/NYT’s stable of writers. I didn’t expect to see the space filled with half-finished blog posts by people who may or may not actually be on the payroll. But I certainly didn’t expect to see the stuff pasted in without any further editing on the part of the IHT staff.

Don’t get me wrong. I still love the paper. And cuts mean that subs don’t have half the time they used to to edit this stuff.

But nevertheless, if newspapers are going to stand any chance at all, they really need to make sure that their material is so, so much better in terms of polish than their online counterparts, otherwise us readers will start to wonder why we’re paying for stuff offline that’s worse than the stuff we read online.

The Future of Animal Advertising

For those of you who listen to podcast versions of my slot on the BBC World Service, this isn’t one. Apologies. What this is is what I hope will be the beginnings of more regular podcast fare known, tentatively, as Loose Wireless. To start off, it’s just me yakking away on subjects that interest me, either stuff I’ve already written about or stuff I’m reading about. I’m hoping to be joined by a few collaborators later, but for now it’s just an experiment. If it doesn’t take up too much time, and there’s an appetite for it, I’ll try to do more. Here’s today’s edition of Loose Wireless, which takes a look at three stories in today’s International Herald Tribune, which seem to carry a theme, best described as: Could cows be the next form of online advertising?

Here it is

A Lesson From the Underground

Security is as much about giving people information as it is about building security systems. That’s the message from the managing director of the London Undergound, Tim O’Toole, but it could as easily apply to personal computer security. Don Phillips’ piece in today’s International Herald Tribune could offer useful lessons to software developers and anyone trying to keep trojans, viruses and spyware at bay:

Tim O’Toole, the managing director of the London Underground, who said a terrorist attack last summer was the greatest Underground crisis since the Nazi blitz of World War II, was telling U.S. transit and rail officials they should avoid the temptation to spend lavishly on new security systems just to reassure the riding public.

Instead, he said, spend first on human resources, including constant training and a system to lavish fresh information continually on every employee in the system during a crisis, even if there is a chance some information could fall into the wrong hands.

O’Toole’s message may not have gone down very well since, “outside the hall where he spoke were many exhibits of expensive new equipment to battle terrorism on transit and rail systems.” One could imagine the same thing happening at a computer security conference. But here, I think, a difference emerges. What I think firewall and antivirus vendors need to think about is this: giving timely, useful and intelligible information to users so they can make good decisions. It’s not about locking everything out, because that’s clearly impossible.

Neither is it about ‘educating the user’. Vendors usually complain that they try to do this but fail, so go the other way — software that does everything silently, behind the scenes, and automatically, with an interface that gives only the barest information or choice to the user. Neither option — education or invisibility — works. Instead, the secret is like the Underground lesson: let people know what’s happening in the context of the situation and threat.

Back to Don’s piece:

O’Toole said the greatest mistake the London Underground had made after the bomb attacks of July 7 was its “poor performance” in keeping employees fully informed of everything that was happening even if that information is sensitive and could not be released to the public right away. In an information vacuum, employees may grow suspicious of authorities just at the time they need to be full members of a crisis team, he said. Management did a “poor job” of information flow during last summer’s attacks, he said. In the future, “We will be pumping everything we know out internally. Some of it may get out, but that’s O.K.”

There’s a clear parallel, in my mind, to Internet threats. Don’t hide knowledge about newly discovered vulnerabilities — newly found holes in existing software that might let bad guys in, if they knew about it — until a fix is found. It’s clear that attacks happen too quickly for antivirus vendors and software developers to be able to cover all contingencies, so better to inform customers and let them assess the risk. The trick is, how to do this?

I would suggest the following guidelines:

  • Most people now have firewalls installed on their desktop computers. These programs — or anti-virus programs, or antispyware programs, or combinations thereof — could become a sort of signalling service giving timely information to the user. For example, the current Kama Sutra worm, Nyxem.E or Grew.A, could be flagged with a small pop-up message informing the user of the danger and offering suggestions.
  • Make the information relevant to the situation. How do I know whether the new updates to my firewall keep me safe from the WinAmp bug identified by Secunia? If something big is happening, letting people know quickly might be more worthwhile than feverishly working on an update which doesn’t reach the user in time. Worst case scenario, the user can just unplug their computer for the rest of the day. Let them make that decision, but give them the information first.
  • The text of such alerts or advisories has got to be useful and clear. ZoneAlarm and other vendors often leave their messages too vague to be meaningful for us ordinary folk, scaring us out of our wits the first few times and then, gradually, just like the wolf crying scenario, we get blasé.

Sadly we’ve become accustomed to ignoring messages we don’t understand. This needs to change. Just like in the ordinary world, we’ve become both numb and constantly terrorized at the same time because of poor or insufficient information. We need to learn lessons about security from other fields. I don’t recommend bombarding users with alerts, but if they are used sparingly, judiciously and with good solid guidance contained inside, I think they are the best way to keep the user in the loop.