Tag Archives: Publishing

Lost in the Flow of The Digital Word

By | August 16, 2010

my weekly column as part of the Loose Wire Service, hence the lack of links. By Jeremy Wagstaff A few weeks ago I wrote about the emergence of the digital book, and how, basically, we should get over our love affair with its physical ancestor and realize that, as with newspapers, rotary dial phones and reel-to-reel tape decks,… Read More »

Google and Penguin: Bookending a Revolution

By | July 5, 2010

By Jeremy Wagstaff (my syndicated Loose Wire column.) As I write this two significant events are taking place: Google has said it will tie up with the American Booksellers Association—the U.S. trade group for independent bookstores—to sell ebooks. And there’s a conference in Bristol celebrating 75 years of the Penguin paperback. Both are milestones. And both carry with… Read More »

The Publisher Audience

By | April 26, 2010

By Robin Lubbock For years I’ve been meaning to write this post, but it seemed so obvious that I kept neglecting to write this thought down. I am the publisher. You are the publisher. Anyone with a screen is the publisher. That changes everything. It moves institutions that are publishers on paper or on the air one step… Read More »

The Economist’s Secret: Its Limits

By | June 17, 2009

Interesting piece by Rafat Ali on paidContent.org quoting Michael Hirschorn of The Atlantic as to why The Economist is doing OK, while Newsweek and TIME are in free-fall: “By repositioning themselves as repositories of commentary and long-form reporting—much like this magazine, it’s worth noting, which has never delivered impressive profit margins—the American newsweeklies are going away from precisely… Read More »

Newspapers’ Challenge

By | April 1, 2009

Newspapers have been scrambling to keep up with the world of blogs. In the process they’re actually destroying what sets them apart. Take this piece from the International Herald Tribune. It’s in this morning’s revamped paper, under the byline of John Doyle—without further affiliation. It’s a good piece, except for a lame ending, but it contains at least… Read More »