The New Attack: Penetrate and Tailor

In its latest security report Cisco identifies a trend I hadn’t heard of before with malware writers: Closer inspection of those computers they’ve successfully penetrated to see whether there’s something interesting there, and then if there is targeting that company (or organisation) with a more tailored follow-up attack:

Attackers can—and do— segregate infected computers into interest areas and modify their methods accordingly. For example, after initial infection by a common downloader Trojan, subsequent information may be collected from infected machinesto identify those systems more likely to lead to sensitive information. Subsequently, those “interesting” machines may be delivered an entirely different set of malware than would other “non-interesting” computers.

This is, as Cisco says, a pretty good example of that much maligned term, the Advanced Persistent Threat. Unfortunately they don’t give more concrete examples. But it seems as if the most targeted sector is the pharmaceuticals and chemical industry: 500% more than the median infection rate, or twice the next industry, oil and gas.

On DoS (Denial of Service) attacks, Cisco says that “while once largely prank-related, DoS attacks are increasingly politically and financially motivated.” It doesn’t add more, unfortunately, and much of the rest of the report is sales-pitch. I’ll try to get more out of them, because there might be some interesting trends lurking behind the rather thin data.

11. August 2011 by jeremy
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