Tag Archives: Web syndication

Another, Fast And Light, RSS Reader

Here’s another free RSS reader.

Rocket Technologies Inc., ‘a leading international provider of current news search and content delivery solutions’ today launched its web-based Rocketinfo RSS Reader. The web-based bit means that folk on company networks who aren’t allowed to download software could use it.

Actually I’m impressed. The reader runs on most browsers and platforms and is amazingly light on its feet. And fast. You can do keyword searches and save them as RSS channels or feeds. You can easily find RSS sources or add a news source or weblog that is available in any version of RSS or Atom. An impressive array of news sources and blogs (sadly not this one) are already listed, but not yet subscribed to. And it’s free, at least for now.

The downsides: Not much configuration possible, and you can’t import OPML files (i.e. collections of your feeds). And you have to register an email address with RocketInfo first. I’m not sure whether RocketInfo is collecting information about your browsing.

More Readers Than You Can Poke A Blog At

I was looking for a new RSS Reader today — RSS is a format that allows, usually, bloggers to have their blogs fed directly to interested subscribers in a format that’s simple and accessible. Rather than visit the blog the reader just opens their email, or, more commonly, a special program called a Reader, and reads the updates from there.

Anyway, there are a lot of readers out there. A lot. Even since the last time I looked a few months back. I won’t recommend one, but you should check out FeedDemon, NewzCrawler. But there are dozens more: Abilon looks cute, as does RSSNewsTicker, which is less of a reader and more of a ticker scrolling across your screen.

The creativity in the blogging and RSS field at the moment is extraordinary. Very impressive.

Software: Psst, Want Another RSS Feed?

 Here’s another way to get your daily dose of blogs, news and RSS feeds (blogs that dripfeed their way through to your desktop without you having to do anything). NewsMonster is “a news, weblog, and RSS aggregator that runs directly in your web browser.”
 
 
“NewsMonster offers a superior web experience and outstanding integration with existing websites and weblogs that support RSS. Even sites that don’t support RSS can work with NewsMonster.”  NewsMonster also incorporates an advanced reputation system to prevent spam and discover and inform you of important news. I have to say that I haven’t checked it out yet.

Box: New to Newsfeeds

 New to Newsfeeds? RSS for beginners
 
How do I get started reading newsfeeds? Newzcrawler and Feedreader, both mentioned in the main article, are the best programs to start with. Feedreader is still in development, but felt pretty stable to me. To add a Really Simple Syndication, or RSS feed, just paste in the link [more on this in a bit] and it should start showing up immediately. Newzcrawler even lets you send stuff from other people’s feeds to your own blog, or on-line journal, or RSS feed. Each program adds the feeds in a slightly different way, but in most cases you’ll be asked to copy a link [the Web site address that appears at the top of your browser] into the newsreader. These links usually end in a full stop, then three letters: RSS, RDF or XML (don’t worry which; they all do the same thing).

This sounds scary. If all this is a bit daunting, try Serence’s KlipFolio (www.serence.com), which is a bit more polished — though still free to the end-user. Now into its second version, it supports Korean and Chinese language Klips. Download the software and then browse the various Klips on offer. An Outlook user? Try NewsGator (www.newsgator.com) which folds all your RSS feeds into an Outlook folder. Or if you’re brave, check out clevercactus (www.clevercactus.com), which is an Outlook-style personal organizer with RSS built in. Here’s a provisional list of newsreaders: www.hebig.org/blogs/archives/main/000877.php

How do I find interesting feeds? A couple of places to start: Feedster (www.feedster.com) is the Google of the RSS/blog world. Another option is Syndic8 (http://www.syndic8.com/), a more select, and searchable, list of feeds. You’ll notice a lot of sites offer their own feeds so you don’t have to go hunting for them. Can’t find a feed for a site you’re interested in? Check out MyRSS (http://myrss.com/) which allows you to build a custom feed for any site, even if it doesn’t have a feed. It’s pretty straightforward, too.

How do I set up my own newsfeed? First you need material, which means setting up a blog. That’s easy enough: my favourites are Weblogger (www.weblogger.com) or Blogger (www.blogger.com). Once you’ve set up a blog, both sites offer simple options to add an RSS feed automatically. That’s it. If you’re a company thinking of setting up a feed, you may want to talk to the pros. The coding is quite simple, but there are ways to add your logo, and other corporate stuff, to ensure some quality control.

Tell me more? Can’t, sorry, I’ve run out of space. Here’s where you can find out more about the whole thing, however:www.faganfinder.com/search/rss.shtml