Tag Archives: Snarfing

Infrared Snarfing?

By | September 15, 2004

Is the Infrared port on your computer a security hazard? LA-based Ligatt Corp, a computer security company, reckon so. In a press release issued yesterday, the company says it was able “to gain entry into two out of ten computers and started copying files” belonging to customers at a local Borders bookstore using a Windows CE-powered PDA. This… Read More »

Welcome To Long Distance Bluesnarfing

By | August 6, 2004

(Please note: I’m not in possession of any bluesnarfing software and I’m not going to link to any. So please don’t bother leaving comments requesting it.) Long distance Bluesnarfing is here. Austrian researcher and Bluetooth expert Martin Herfurt tells me that he and some friends — Mike Outmesguine, John Hering, James Burgess and Kevin Mahaffey — were able… Read More »

The Bluesnarfing Skeptics

By | May 23, 2004

Is Bluesnarfing the big problem it’s made out to be? “Traditionally,” wrote Guy Kewney of eWeek earlier this month, “security consultants have made a passable living by frightening ignorant managers with security holes. Then they charge money to fix them.” He then takes a look at bluesnarfing, which regular readers of this blog and the column will already… Read More »

Bluetooth Security – The World Wakes Up?

By | May 11, 2004

The corporate world, it seems, is waking up to Bluetooth security issues. At the same time there is a growing slew of products to make them sleep safer. InfoSync World writes of new security software from Bluefire Security which “disables Bluetooth and Infrared communication to minimize the risk of information theft.” Bluefire Mobile Firewall Plus 3.0 allows system… Read More »

This week’s column – Mailbag

By | April 29, 2004

This week’s Loose Wire column answers readers’ questions on Bluesnarfing, the unpleasant term for the unpleasant process of remotely stealing the data from a Bluetooth-equipped cellphones, the wonders of PowerDesk and ExplorerPlus, and browser wars. Full text at the Far Eastern Economic Review (subscription required, trial available) or at WSJ.com (subscription required). Old columns at feer.com here.