Tag Archives: knowledge management

How A Twitter Scrap, and Covid-19, Reveal a Disruption In Process

By | May 8, 2020

When is innovation just another stab at the past, and when is it revolutionary? When it becomes a bit of a Twitter storm in a teacup, is possibly when. Here’s an interesting case study in the offing: You might need to get your head around some unfamiliar terms, like bi-directional linking, breadcrumb navigation and transclusion. Or not. My… Read More »

Why Won’t Computers Do What We Want Them To?

By | April 13, 2020

(Post updated 2020-07-15 07:37 to include postscript on JK Rowling’s planning technique.)  Computers and the software that runs them have long denied us the basic right of dictating to them — not letters and grocery lists, but of what they should actually do for us – most importantly in the first step of thinking: the art of taking… Read More »

Blogs And The Suppression Of Dissent

By | September 8, 2004

Do blogs suppress dissent? Somewhat against the grain, this, but Michael Feldstein of eLearn magazine reckons blogs can “amplify and accelerate the spread of bad information that leads to bad decisions”. Looking at how stock market bubbles and fashion crazes start, Feldstein says that “the same sorts of problems are likely or even inevitable in certain kinds of… Read More »

Knowledge Management, Corporate Blogging, and Scobleizer

By | July 23, 2004

This week I wrote a couple of pieces on Knowledge Management for the Far Eastern Economic Review — a sort of overview of KM for the layman, and a column on corporate blogging, centred around Robert Scoble. (Both are subscription only, I’m afraid. The WSJ version of the column will appear here next week.) Here’s a taster: ONCE… Read More »