Tag Archives: Furl

A Directory of Social Annotation Tools

Update July 24 2006: Diigo is now live, combining “Social Bookmarking, Web Highlighter, Sticky-Note & Clipping to make it a powerful tool for online research, collaboration and information discovery”. Looks good; I’d be interested in hearing how people get on with it.

Social annotation, sometimes called web annotation, is back. Put simply, it’s software that allows users to “leave” comments on webpages they visit, so that others visiting the page,  and using the same software, can see their comments. Used well, it’s very useful, as useful as Amazon book reviews, say. Used badly it ends up laden down with offensive and sophomoric graffiti. A few years back (around 1999/2000, if I recall. I’m thinking uTok and ThirdVoice) there were quite a few of these around. Most have gone. Now, with social tagging and blogs, perhaps it’s time for a comeback. (I’m not including any social bookmarking tool here; I guess the distinction is that these tools allow the comments to be read without the surfer leaving the site itself. For ordinary clippings tools go here.)

Here’s the beginnings of a list:

  • WizLite “allows you to highlight text (like on real paper) on any page on the Internet and share it with everybody (or just your friends).” Nicely executed, though development has been sporadic.
  • trailfire marks “web pages that interest you and add your comments. Stitch them together to form a trail. Send trails to your friends, post them in your blog, or publish them on Trailfire.com. Use Trailfire to communicate your own view of the web.” Yes, I’m not quite sure what it means either.
  • Diigo combines “social bookmarking, clippings, in situ annotation, tagging, full-text search of everything, easy sharing and interactions.” Now live.
  • Squidoo lets you join thousands of people making their own “lenses” on their favorite stuff and ideas. It’s fast, fun and free. (And you could even get paid).
  • Jeteye enables users to create, send, view and share any type of online content, add notes and annotations and save it all in user organized Jetpaks™ through an easy drag and drop interface.
  • Chatsum “is a FREE add-on for your web browser that lets you chat with all the other Chatsum users that are looking at the same website as you.” (thanks, pieman)
  • Gabbly  “enables people to instantly connect and collaborate around any content, topic or interest.”
  • Wikalong “is a Firefox Extension that embeds a wiki in the Sidebar of your browser, which corresponds to the current page you are viewing. In its simplest form, a wiki-margin for the internet, but it can be much more.” I like this one because it makes best use of the sidebar. But it’s basic and only works on Firefox.
  • BlogEverywhere “is a simple way for you to log your thoughts and comments on any web page “without leaving it” . It enables you to have a conversation with other readers of that page.” (Thanks, Charles)
  • stickis by activeweave “is a simple and unobtrusive part of your web experience: wherever you are, stickis are there with you, helping you see, compose, and remix all the web, your way.” Still in closed alpha, so I’m not quite sure what that means.
  • Annozilla is another Firefox extension that is “designed to view and create annotations associated with a web page”.
  • Boingle “is a stripped down social annotation system that lets you annotate within web pages with the result being a simple markup (“Boingles (2)”) that looks as though it belongs in the page, much as a link titled “Comments (4)” looks normal within a blog. It is very understated in nature, and lets the annotation content itself be the star.”
  • HyLighter “extends the potential of documents as a medium for the negotiation of meaning. Use HyLighter to make what you understand more transparent and how you understand more effective.” Whatever that means. Website seems to be idle.
  • Plum Why is collecting and sharing, beyond photos and email, so hard? Why can’t I put all my favorite stuff in one place? (still in private beta; it’s not as hard as it was before, guys)

Please do let me know what I’ve left out; I’m sure there’s more. I do get the feeling that this kind of thing is going to make a comeback. But the ones which work will be those that allow either everyone, or groups of users to see each other’s comments on web pages, and to leverage tagging and other new things we’ve gotten used to see comparable pages. And some way of filtering out the silliness would be good.

technorati tags: , , ,

Searching for Tags

Denis Sinegubko tells me of his new tag searching facility in his software FirstStop WebSearch. Here’s an excerpt from his FirstStop Blog: Social Bookmarks in FirstStop WebSearch which explains it in more detail:

The pre-installed (in version 4.2) category “Social Bookmarks” contains the following search sources: LookSmart’s Furl.net, CiteULike.org, and Zniff.com, a search engine for the Spurl.net. Anticipating your question about del.icio.us, I can tell you that we didn’t include this very popular social bookmarks manager only because it doesn’t have a search facility.

Sounds like an interesting tool.

What’s The Difference Between A Search Engine, A Search Destination And A Portal?

LookSmart has today unveiled some more focused search engines, according to a press release from the company:

It calls them ‘vertical search destinations’ to ‘provide niche audiences with essential search results, versus the typically exhaustive returns from other search engines’:

Two additional resources are dedicated to parents:

Here’s LookSmart’s philosophy: “LookSmart believes that search on the Web will become increasingly vertical and personal. Consumers turn to the Web in search of essential content, be it related to a hobby, work or education,” says Debby Richman, senior vice president of consumer products for LookSmart.

The idea is to ‘tightly integrate’ these engines, or ‘destinations’ (kinda blurs the distinction between a search engine and a portal, eh folks?) via Furl, LookSmart’s consumer online filing cabinet. I’m not quite clear how that tight integration is going to work, but it will be interesting to watch.

A New Kind Of Tagging?

Everyone uses Google but what about narrowing down your search, or looking for something that may not be on the open Web?

One option is FindArticles, owned and just re-launched by LookSmart.com, which last July acquired Furl, the social bookmarking service. According to a press release issued today, improvements mean that FindArticles’ features include the ability to search by topic, or view only “Free Articles,” making it easier for Web searchers to find what they want without having to scroll through pages and pages of search results. Once searchers find what they’re after, they can save the entire page with Furl — LookSmart’s personalized, online bookmarking service.

FindArticles gives searchers the ability to sort through a comprehensive collection of reliable sources that includes more than 1,000 publications. Searchers can sort results by article date, length, relevance or publication name, and can refine the relevance of their results by inserting new search terms as needed.

Other new features include “hot new articles” and “top articles ever” for each of FindArticles’ neatly organized categories: Arts & Entertainment, Automotive, Business & Finance, Computers & Technology, Health & Fitness, Home & Garden, News & Society, Reference & Education, and Sports.

The press release says FindArticles has articles from thousands of resources with archives dating back to 1984, and millions of articles not found on any other search engine. By working with the best sources, FindArticles has compiled all the essential publications covering a wide range of subjects — and is continually adding to the collection.

Worth checking out. I’m interested by synergies between Furl and FindArticles, although of course I’m also concerned that this might be at the cost of the the broader opportunities of a more open system like del.icio.us.

LookSmart Acquires Furl

This whole grab-stuff-from- the-net-and-store-it- somewhere-you-might- be-able-to-find-it thing seems to be taking off at long last.

Furl, which allows you to save clips from the Internet and store/share/access/search them easily, has just told its customers in an email (no URL available yet) that it has been bought by LookSmart, a SF-based “provider of Web search and research-quality articles”.

Furl’s Mike Giles, Founder & CEO, has assured its users that “LookSmart has no intention of changing the things that make it great. On the contrary, LookSmart is committed to making existing features even more powerful.” To sweeten the move for users, Furl is giving each 5 gigabytes of storage, and has promised that the service will remain free.