Tag Archives: Click

Podcast: Viral Rhymes

The BBC World Service Business Daily version of my piece on Nursery Rhymes: History’s Most Viral Startup? (The Business Daily podcast is here; the original piece is here.)  

Loose Wireless 110330

To listen to Business Daily on the radio, tune into BBC World Service at the following times, or click here.

 Australasia: Mon-Fri 0141*, 0741 

East Asia: Mon-Fri 0041, 1441 
South Asia: Tue-Fri 0141*, Mon-Fri 0741 
East Africa: Mon-Fri 1941 
West Africa: Mon-Fri 1541* 
Middle East: Mon-Fri 0141*, 1141* 
Europe: Mon-Fri 0741, 2132 
Americas: Tue-Fri 0141*, Mon-Fri 0741, 1041, 2132

Thanks to the BBC for allowing me to reproduce it as a podcast.

Podcast: Facebook, Hitler and iPad Grandma

Thispodcast is from my weekly slot on Radio Australia Today with Phil Kafcaloudes and Adelaine Ng, wherein I chat about:

  • Facebook’s new initiative: a deal with the devil or a whole new web?
  • YouTube takes down copyright infringing-content. Including all those Hitler parody videos
  • 99 year old woman gets iPad for birthday, writes limerick
  • Connecting to the social web on the go: lots of people are doing it. Soon you’ll be able to do it via your clothing.

To listen to the podcast, click on the button below. To subscribe, click here.

Loose Wireless 100423       

I appear on Radio Australia Today every Friday at about 9.15 am Singapore time (that’s 0.15 GMT/UTC.) There’s a live stream of the broadcast here, or find out your local frequencies here.

Podcast: Hackers on Film, Cellphone Recycling ATMs

Thispodcast is from my weekly slot on Radio Australia Today with Phil Kafcaloudes and Adelaine Ng, wherein I chat about:

  • The hacker on celluloid
  • How to recyle your phone via an ATM machine (and get some money for it). etc etc…

To listen to the podcast, click on the button below. To subscribe, click here.

Loose Wireless 100226

I appear on Radio Australia Today every Friday at about 9.15 am Singapore time (that’s 0.15 GMT/UTC.) There’s a live stream of the broadcast here, or find out your local frequencies here.

How to Manage Your Nokia Phone

image

Nokia has finally woken up to the potential of connecting its phones to a computer. Although you could do it before, Nokia has launched a new version of its PC Suite, that makes some great strides in allowing you to use the computer to manage and monitor your cellphone.

The vision is a simple, and yet elusive, one. We work on our computers when we’re stationary. And on our phone when we’re mobile. But as far as we’re concerned we’re still doing the same thing: working. We can synchronize our data between those two devices, but operating both in real time is more problematic: there are tools to allow us to access our computer data from a phone, but sending and receiving SMS messages, for example, is still considered a phone activity, not a computer one.

It’s a technical barrier, not a lifestyle one. And here’s how to bridge it.

Your Nokia phone should have come with a cable. You’ll need that, and you’ll need the latest version of the PC Suite (this works only with Windows, unfortunately), which you can get from here  (http://is.gd/2aiL). 

Install the software, and then follow the instructions for connecting phone to computer.

When the two devices are connected, a list of options will appear on your phone. Select PC Suite.

Click on the Click here to connect a phone and follow the instructions:

Capture_473

The new bit with this version of the software is the smoother and more thorough handling of contacts and SMS messages. To try this out, click on the envelope icon and you’ll see a list of messages from your phone:

Capture_474

This effectively gives you full access to all the messages and contacts on your phone, and also allows you to send and reply to messages straight from your phone, but without the fiddly screen.

Clicking on the Contacts button on the left hand bottom corner of the program window lets you edit, add, and delete entries from your phone:

Capture_475

This is not perfect. I noticed I couldn’t always delete text from a field, and don’t expect the software to automatically notify you of incoming messages.

But it’s a start, and another good reason to buy Nokia phones.

Another tip: If you’ve got Bluetooth on your computer, configure your PC and phone so they talk to each other. That way you don’t need to carry the cable around with you.

This is the closest I’ve seen to making the phone an appendage to your computer, where it seamlessly integrates in terms of data and functionality. Some steps to go, but kudos to Nokia for pushing the envelope. Hopefully soon enough we won’t notice or care what medium—SMS, email, chat–we’re using, because it will all be one simple interface. That day just came closer.

©Loose Wire Pte Ltd.

Jeremy Wagstaff is a Singapore-based commentator on technology. His guide to using computers, Loose Wire, is available in bookshops or on Amazon. He can be found online at jeremywagstaff.com or via email at jeremy@loose-wire.com.

Another Newsmapping Site: newsQuakes

Just got an email from Ronan Cremin, who points me to his newsQuakes:

world news for the lazy. Hover over the quakes to see the headlines, click to go to actual news article.

As Ronan says in his email, newsQuakes ‘uses a similar approach to Buzztracker, but predates it by about 3 years. Not as polished, but nice nonetheless’.