Tag Archives: wireless technology

Broadbangladesh

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Illustration IHT, by Felipe Galindo

I wrote a piece for the IHT on a company of expats bringing wireless broadband to their native Bangladesh. Would love to have gone there to have a look, but budgets aren’t what they were (love the illustration):

In Bangladesh, where less than 1 percent of the population has Internet access and where the rare broadband connection is prohibitively expensive, bridging the digital divide may require new approaches.

A group of Bangladeshi expatriates think they have found one that could work – a plan to bring affordable Internet access to their homeland through a blend of high-end wireless technology and social entrepreneurship.

Bringing Bangladesh into the Internet age – International Herald Tribune

Bluetooth’s Missing Suitcase

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Remember when Samsonite launched the Bluetooth suitcase? No, well, that’s not surprising, because they didn’t. This week’s WSJ.com column is (subscription only, I’m afraid) the first in a series about finding stuff in the real world. I started with a hunt for the Bluetooth suitcase, first announced in 2002 (and weirdly, still up on the Samsonite website):

I got all excited five years ago when Samsonite announced a suitcase that used Bluetooth, a wireless technology more commonly used to connect cellphones to headsets, to carry data about the owner and alert him or her if the case was moved. Hooray, I thought: Now we’ll all know where our luggage is. Unfortunately not: The Samsonite Hardlite never saw the light of day for technical reasons, although the company says it’s still looking at other ways to identify and secure luggage.

This is about as close as we came to the idea that the wireless technologies we now take for granted — Bluetooth, WiFi, infrared, cellphones, GPS — would actually help us stay in touch with the important things in life, like our stuff. Which is a shame. I would love to be able to ping all the Bluetooth gadgets in my house via my cellphone and know where they are. One Bluetooth headset has been missing for years.

I then take a look at what’s available. But what intrigued me was: what happened to the Samsonite case? This is what Samsonite PR came up with:

It seems from what I can gather this collection was in the end not launched. The reasons seem to be quite numerous – the cost to the consumer would have been significant, a lot of mobile phones were not compatible with the technology at the time, and today would still require additional memory.

Another person I contacted had this to say:

Basically the project did not make it to the market because of several reasons.

About 10 pieces were made for field testing, but there were issues on the standardisation. At the time Bluetooth technology was still at an early development stage and not yet standardised, so for a product to be able to ‘talk’ to another wasn’t that straight forward and obvious. Therefore after the field testing it was decided that the benefits for the consumer just weren’t sufficient. At the moment there are no plans to resurrect the project.

Which I found interesting. To me, back in 2002, the suitcase made all sorts of sense. Bluetooth, cellphones, missing suitcases: who wouldn’t have gone for something like that? But Bluetooth has always been a bit of a devil when it comes to anything other than really basic connectivity. Even Mac users have been heard to complain of connecting Bluetooth devices to their laptops.

Would today’s Bluetooth be able to cope with with this kind of concept now? Is it already doing so? Or would security concerns — how long would it take before someone puts together software to reprogram the data on a Samsonite suitcase so it gets diverted to Luang Prabang?

Logitech’s Bluetooth pen

Logitech are about to bring out their io2 pen for Bluetooth:

This summer, Logitech will launch a Bluetooth-enabled version of the io2 Digital Pen, designed to address the current data entry shortcomings of mobile data capture devices. Logitech’s Bluetooth digital pen, when used in combination with a Bluetooth wireless handheld device, will help an organization’s mobile workforce more efficiently gather, transmit and share important data.

A press release gives a bit more detail: Using the Logitech io2 Digital Pen with Bluetooth technology, a mobile worker will be able to capture information by using a customized version of a standard paper form, such as for an insurance appraisal or a work order. The pen automatically creates a digital record that is transmitted to a complementary Bluetooth wireless technology enabled handheld communication device, such as a smart mobile phone, PDA or Blackberry. That data can be stored and processed on the handheld device or immediately sent into an organization’s central database for processing. For the mobile worker, it’s an automated process that starts with filling out a familiar form and ends with a confirmation on his or her wireless handheld communication device that the information has been sent and received.

Sounds interesting, although I’m not quite clear about how this differs from the Nokia SU-1B pen, which originates from the same Anoto source. And why aim only at business users with this?

Nokia’s New Keyboard, And The Limitations Of Bluetooth

Nokia are getting into the keyboard game, clearly hoping their new range of mobile phones are going to replace PDAs (via blueserker)

The Nokia Wireless Keyboard SU-8W uses Bluetooth and will work with the Nokia 7610, Nokia 6260 and Nokia 6630 mobile phones. In the future, Nokia says, more phones may be added to this list. The keyboard is expected to be available in the last quarter of 2004.

Nothing surprising here, except the Bluetooth element. Why won’t the keyboard work with other Bluetooth phones? Some writers have pointed out the keyboard uses the Bluetooth Human Interface Device, or HID, profile, meaning, according to mobileburn.com, ”that it should work with many other Bluetooth devices that also support that profile, such as PCs and PDAs”.

And why, according to Nokia, won’t it work at the same time as a Bluetooth headset? Nokia says, You can only use one enhancement using Bluetooth wireless technology at a time.” Huh? I thought the whole point of Bluetooth was that it would hook up all sorts of gadgets without limit. In my uninformed world, headsets used specific Bluetooth profiles — Handsfree and Headset — while keyboards and whatnot used the HID profile.

Conclusion: Either manufacturers are not implementing Bluetooth properly — intentionally, perhaps, to limit users to their brand and new models — or Bluetooth is not as good as it’s supposed to be. Either way, I hear more warning bells sounding for the future of the wireless standard.

China’s Static Mobile Phone, And Its Mobile Static Phone

One of the things I noticed at last week’s CommunicAsia expo in Singapore was the range of phones. And not just fancy handhelds touted by dancing, skintight woven women, although that did claim some of my attention. But China, for example, is pumping out machines that run the gamut of needs, including desktop GSM phones.

Guanri, for example, of Shenzhen, sells several phones that use either CDMA or GSM wireless technology for phones that either sit in your office, or work as payphones, both for public places and ‘supervised locations’, which I take to mean shops or kiosks where someone can make sure you don’t run off with the phone and where they rather than the phone takes the money you owe for using it.

I realise this isn’t anything new: Africa and poorer regions do a lot of this kind of thing. But I guess this idea of a GSM phone masquerading as a desktop phone is kind of new, and represents a challenge to China’s quasi mobile market, where a technology originally devised for Japan called  Personal Handyphone System (PHS) uses a Wireless Local Loop (WLL) to offer a sort of mobile access, at least when you’re in range of an antenna.

The idea, I guess is one of applying the principle in reverse — where you can only use the cellphone when you’re near a loop — so that your use of the phone is limited by the fact that it’s physically stuck to your desk. Either way you’re making the most of what is available — a network that is not particularly farflung, but more accessible than a landline for which you’ll have to wait several blue moons.

News: Beware The Mobile Phone

 I have long believed that we use mobile phones too much, considering what little we know about the effects on our health. Why is why I like handsfree sets and SMS. Most studies that say they’re bad for us have been pooh-poohed. Here’s another one to throw out because we don’t like what it says.
 
The Independent quotes a new study from Sweden as saying mobile phones and the new wireless technology could cause a “whole generation” of today’s teenagers to go senile in the prime of their lives. Professor Leif Salford, who headed the research at Sweden’s prestigious Lund University, says “the voluntary exposure of the brain to microwaves from hand-held mobile phones” is “the largest human biological experiment ever”. And he is concerned that, as new wireless technology spreads, people may “drown in a sea of microwaves”.