Tag Archives: Waves

Podcast: Privacy and Twitter

This podcast is from my weekly slot on Radio Australia Today with Phil Kafcaloudes and Adelaine Ng, wherein I chat about the issues of privacy concerning an inappropriate tweet, Google’s indexing of recent tweets, and some iPhone apps that let you spot celebrities.

To listen to the podcast, click on the button below. To subscribe, click here.

Loose Wireless 100416

I appear on Radio Australia Today every Friday at about 9.15 am Singapore time (that’s 0.15 GMT/UTC.) There’s a live stream of the broadcast here, or find out your local frequencies here.

Your MP3 Player As Your Phone

I’m not convinced that this gadget is exactly the wonder it claims to be, but it’s an interesting fusion of functions. The soon-to-be-launched Ezmax MP3 Player includes a VoIP feature that, in the words of PC World’s Paul Kallender

when the device is linked to an Internet-connected PC via a USB 2.0 port, people can make local and international calls using a microphone that is included in the device’s earphone cord.

I must confess I share some of the skepticism expressed about whether this is a breakthrough product or a gimmick. But there are some interesting elements here that perhaps merit a closer look:

For one, this represents an interesting variation on the idea of USB application drive, where you keep the programs (and not just the data) that you need on a portable drive. (Here’s a discussion of the issue and some examples.) In this role the EZMP-4200P is simply working as portable application device.

But there’s also the built in microphone, which illustrates how the quality of recording, both in terms of input (the microphone) and storage (compression, sampling) have improved. I’m still using my Olympus DM-1 to record interviews but this is old, expensive and stale technology. It would be much better to have the same capability on a key drive (or, as some people do nowadays, their cellphone. iPods are an option, but an extra load.) The existing EZMP-4000 for example, already lets you record your lectures or conferences for up to a maximum of 18 hours(on a basis of 256MB) through a built-in high efficient mike. The USB drive as a good digital recorder. That’s pretty much all a journalist, writer, academic or whatever needs.

Then there’s the idea of identity on a stick. The EZMP-4200P, according to the article, would contain details of the VoIP accounts held by the user, and, while of course it needn’t serve an actual authentication role, it could. Carry your USB drive around, just plug it in to an Internet-connected PC and all your VoIPs accounts synchronise, just like your email, capturing voicemail, letting you make calls etc. Your USB drive would be like a SIM card: Just yours.

So maybe the EZMP isn’t that great a leap in itself, but it’s a sign of the opportunities that USB drives could provide.

News: Don’t Laugh, Your Email’s Coming

 
 Not sure whether to laugh or cry at this one. Or tiptoe quietly away. Researchers at Australia’s Monash University, the New Scientist reports, are working on software that would that automatically log you onto the nearest computer by listening out for your voice, or laugh, or footsteps. Microphones on each computer, Rachel Nowak writes, would pick up a person’s voice, or listen for familiar footsteps coming or going. The software would then recognise them and calculate where they are, using flocks of ‘intelligent agents’ – pieces of computer code that move from computer to computer. “The agents,” she writes, “close in on those computers where the person’s voice is loudest, until they pinpoint the nearest one.”
 
The agents — or sneaky little tattletales, depending on your point of view — would, upon realising that you were heading towards the Mars Bar dispenser, deliver your email to the nearest computer, or, upon hearing your rich baritone laugh by the water cooler, administer a pithy reprimand and remind you that your expenses are horribly overdue. I’m not sure I’m ready for this kind of life. We already have an accounts department.