Tag Archives: Verizon Communications Inc.

The Death of WorldCom

WorldCom, once the U.S.’ second largest long distance phone company before falling into bankruptcy and fraud convictions, is no more. At least, as a name. As Netcraft, a UK-based Internet monitoring and security company, records:

WorldCom.com has been taken offline, erasing the web’s last traces of the brand that became a symbol of white collar crime and the largest bankruptcy in U.S. history. The domains worldcom.com and worldcom.net have been taken out of the DNS database, meaning requests for those URLs return no response. The domains continue to be owned by MCI, Inc. the WorldCom successor that was bought earlier this year by Verizon for $7.6 billion.

When a company is acquired, its domain names are typically redirected to the web site of the acquiring company to capture potential customers searching for the old URL. Redirection services are freely provided by most registrars. But worldcom.com and worldcom.net have no A record listed in their DNS settings, suggesting the domains have been intentionally taken offline to “retire” the name.

The MCIWorldcom.com, however, takes you to http://euat-consumer.mci.com/ .

IVR Cheat Sheets, And Dirty Tricks?

The IVR debate rumbles on. Could automated voice phone systems be better than just having a human answering the phone? Is it better to cheat the system? Paul English’s cheat sheet has appeared more than 100 TV and radio stations in a month. One company, Angel.com, has been fighting back, first with a pretty harsh broadside, but now appears to have replaced it (the page redirects) with a more measured ‘IVR Cheat Sheet for Businesses’, figuring, I guess, that if you can’t beat ‘em, join ‘em.

Anyway, I got an interesting take on it this morning as a comment appended to my blog from someone who identified herself as Kate, with a believable-looking email address. ‘She’ wrote:

Paul English makes some great points. I saw his piece on ABC World News Tonight and he’s bringing to light that most companies operating in the IVR space have shoddy systems. In my opinion, Angel.com is one of the few companies in the IVR industry trying to change things, however, with web-based next generation systems that link to CRM systems. Small businesses are finally able to create IVR systems (using a self service model if they wish) that are even more sophisticated than what large industry is using. My Dad uses the system for his online ebay store selling vintage posters and autographed baseballs. He’s able to provide far better customer service using Angel.com’s system than he would ever be able to provide on his own. The boon to small business of using these inexpensive, next generation IVR systems is getting lost in the debate.

That’s one well-written comment. I was impressed (as I imagine, would be Angel.com. Not only can they be linked with the little guy (and who wants to bash the little guy?) but they get to bash some of their competitors too). But not being cynical about the posting, I allowed it through and emailed ‘Kate’ with a request to interview her father. If true, it’s a valid point and one to explore.

What I didn’t expect was for the email to bounce. Not that unusual, especially with comment spam, but not when the given name (‘Kate’) jibes with the email address (‘katerobins@yahoo.com’). Why go to the trouble of putting a believable fake email address, especially when you presumably would be quite happy if someone followed up and got a bit of publicity for your eBay-selling dad? Baffled, I checked the IP address where the comment came from: a Verizon address in Washington DC. Not, coincidentally, that far from Angel.com HQ in McLean, Virginia.

I wish I could say my sleuthing took me further. But I could find no Kate Robins in the phone book, no sign of someone with that Yahoo address on Google, or anyone on eBay who might be her dad (not that surprising; it’s a big place). I’ll keep looking, but if anyone knows Kate Robins, her dad, or could shed any light on this, I’d love to hear from them. I’d hate to think that my blog is being used by anonymous shills to do damage limitation exercises for the IVR/CRM industry. On the other hand, if Kate does exist and just mistyped her email address, I’d love to follow up the angle she suggests.

Even Mayors Get Dialer Scammed

It’s not just small fry getting hooked in the great modem hijacking/dialer scam.

The Derrick, a publication from Pennsylvania’s Oil City, reports the town’s former mayor has become embroiled, demanding Verizon forgive $1,200 in charges. Verizon has so far refused to forgive Malachy McMahon’s debt.

McMahon is going after Verizon, who he sees as complicit in the scam: “For a corporation to condone and profit from this is beyond me, in the case of Verizon,” the publication quoted McMahon as saying. “It’s illegal activity. They’re after phone usage. It’s big-time money when they go overseas.” Local prosecutors are looking into this and other cases.

Part of the problem is that the billing is not just to the telco. Another company, National One Telecom, claims he owes $76 for calls. National One seems to make its money from charging an “entertainment fee” for accessing certain websites — which are not named on the bills. Some of the fee goes to the telco, some to National One. This is how National Telecom describes itself:

National One Telecom, Inc.’s mission is to provide billing solutions for clients with audiotext services, videotext services, long distance services, and other telecommunications services.

Our goal is to seamlessly merge Internet technologies with technologies seen in traditional telephone networks. Together with our clients we create a bridge between the two allowing for better ecommerce and telephone access to a wide national audience.

In addition to this, we are committed to helping our customers understand these new billing solutions and are willing to walk them through step by step in case they have any questions or problems. Thank you for your business.

Hmm. The most amusing bit of the Derrick story is this end quote from a Verizon spokesman: Modem hijacking, while “an industry-wide problem, is not really a telephone-company issue per se. It’s really an Internet issue.” Sure. Telcos, watch out.

News: Pssst! Wanna See Some SMS?

 A sign of the times? ThreeZee Technology, Inc., a security research firm, has located a bug within the Verizon Wireless Text Messaging system which allows any Tom, Dick or Harry to “easily view mass lists of SMS messages sent to Verizon customers, including the telephone number and the text in the message”. Not just that: Tom (or Dick, or Harry) can then use the bug to intercept messages sent to any such phone, as well as the ability to make numerous charges to the customer’s phone bill. Yikes.
 
 
This is bad, of course, but it’s not a feature of SMS per se, more of the website that Verizon set up to allow folk to send SMS messages to Verizon phones. Still, hopefully Verizon will fix it. No sign so far of any mention of the problem on their website.