Tag Archives: Valentine’s Day

Cupid’s (Possibly) Poison Arrow

Could Valentine’s Day be a phishing day? Internet Security Systems, Inc. reckons so, saying in a press release (no URL available yet) that the number of dating sites across the world has increased by 17 per cent within the last twelve months. ISS reckons this rise “is partly attributed to the increase in malevolent websites used by developers of malicious code as an opportune moment for phishing, spam and hacker attacks on unsuspecting victims.”

Having said, that, there doesn’t seem to be a lot of strong evidence presented to back this claim up. “Organised criminal units have in the past timed their attacks to coincide with popular celebration occasions in order to achieve maximum success in compromising the integrity of computer systems,” the press release quotes Gunter Ollman, Director of X-Force at Internet Security Systems. “It is anticipated that Valentine’s Day is a day that is similarly marked on the criminals’ calendar for targeted attacks.” Makes sense, but isn’t this a tad alarmist? Should we ignore every Valentine Card we get (assuming we get any)?

ISS offers the usual suggestions about defending yourself from these poisoned Cupid arrows, as well as pointing out that it can provide its own solution, via a “Proventia Web Filter which blocks unwanted web content, optimises Internet access for employees and prevents any kind of non work related Internet use.”. Yes, of course. Ye old “press release as pitch posing as public service ad” trick.

Given that Internet Security Systems, Inc. has been, according to its own blurb, “an established world leader in security since 1994”, I guess I’d expect to see a bit more hard data to back up this kind of scaremongering. It’s not that I don’t believe that scumbags will use Valentine’s Day as a social engineering tool to pry open your gullibility, but I’m not sure security companies should just throw out warnings like this without more carefully callibrated data to justify it. Where is all the data about previous year’s attacks along these lines? Where are the examples to illustrate the problem, and the sophistication of the bad guys? What kind of data are they after? We deserve to be told if we’re going to bin potentially our only chance at happiness.

Valentine’s Day – A Humbug Approach

It’s that time of year, and the marketing folk are back with lame Valentine’s promotions.

My first is from Audible.com, where I must have registered at some point, because I got an email with the subject field ‘Someone has sent you a Valentine!’ along with the following message: ‘Get a special Valentine’s day wish (and a little gift) from Audible.’

The link turns out to be a pretty dull flash presentation, some annoying music that doesn’t stop when the flash animation does, and the ‘gift’ turns out to be a 20% discount at audible.com. Thanks, guys. No, really.

What is perhaps reassuring is a survey from Avantgo, which reports that the majority of folk prefer social introductions to finding true love. Actually I think they’re missed the point; although the survey focuses on preference for traditional dating methods –  only 4% ranked online dating as the best way to meet their Valentine — the fact that 14% of correspondents ‘claimed to be dating, married or engaged to someone they met through an online dating service or social networking site’ is an extraordinary statistic.

Think about it. Most folk don’t like to admit they use dating services, let alone online ones. So the fact that so many people have ‘fessed up is a surprising shift in attitudes. Second, assume the figure is much higher, because of the lingering stigma attached. So it could be as high as 20%. Now, of course, these surveys tend to revolve around early adopters (it was a PDA-based survey, whatever that is) so it’s skewed, but it’s still a significant proportion. The survey tells us that online dating has become normal.

It also, sadly, tells us that folk are using Valentine’s Day as an excuse to exchange presents:  ‘While men plan to give their loved ones traditional gifts such as flowers, dinner out and chocolates, they are secretly hoping to receive an electronic gadget or CD/DVD. A third of respondents plan to spend more than $100 on their Valentine this year.’ Jeez! Do we really need another commercially exploited occasion to prod us guiltily into buying presents? Heaven help us all.

If you do insist on buying stuff, here are some Valentine Panties with built in Internet error codes: “Our HTTPanties Valentine’s Gift Box comes with one pair of white “403 Forbidden” panties and one pair of black “200 OK” panties, packaged in our lovely “Hearts and Stars” heart shaped box. Makes a great gift!” OhmyGod.

I am beginning to see what folk like Joi Ito are talking about when they talk about corrupting holidays. Talking of Japan, the whole Valentine’s thing has gotten way out of hand, primarily because of the confectionary industry. Joi wrote a few weeks back: ‘in Japan only men receive chocolates on Valentine’s Day and that women receive their chocolates on “White Day” one month later. (This notion was introduced by the confectionary industry in Japan.) People are encouraged to give chocolates widely and these chocolates are called giri choko (obligatory indebtedness chocolates) in Japanese.’ Now it’s the handphone industry getting in on the act: Nokia are promoting their handphones in Japan by selling them in a Valentine’s box, along with some chocolates (Thanks Gizmodo and Boing Boing):

I’m never going to celebrate Valentine’s Day again. Ever. After I’ve bought the panties and phone chocs.