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Libya’s Stuxnet?

A group of security professionals who have good credentials and strong links to the U.S. government have outlined a Stuxnet-type attack on Libyan infrastructure, according to a document released this week. But is the group outlining risks to regional stability, or is it advocating a cyber attack on Muammar Gadhafi? The document, Project Cyber Dawn (PDF), was released on May 28 2011 by CSFI – the Cyber Security Forum Initiative, which describes itself as non-profit organization headquartered in Omaha, NE and in Washington DC with a mission “to provide Cyber Warfare awareness, guidance, and security solutions through collaboration, education, volunteer work, and training to assist theContinue readingLibya’s Stuxnet?

Newspapers’ Challenge

Newspapers have been scrambling to keep up with the world of blogs. In the process they’re actually destroying what sets them apart. Take this piece from the International Herald Tribune. It’s in this morning’s revamped paper, under the byline of John Doyle—without further affiliation. It’s a good piece, except for a lame ending, but it contains at least four grammatical or spelling errors: “the Scotland” twice (“Darren Fletcher was the Scotland’s best player”) “England, under am Italian manager” “There is a poetry of national longing and a poetic justice being behind the success of the Celtic countries.” Good luck making sense of that. Now IContinue readingNewspapers’ Challenge

Is New Media Ready for Old Media?

I’m very excited by the fact that newspapers are beginning to carry content from the top five or so Web 2.0/tech sites. These blogs (the word no longer seems apt for what they do; Vindu Goel calls them ‘news sources’) have really evolved in the past three years and the quality of their coverage, particularly that of ReadWrite Web, has grown in leaps and bounds. Now it’s being carried by the New York Times. A couple of nagging questions remain, however. 1) Is this old media eating new media, or new media eating the old? On the surface this is a big coup for folkContinue readingIs New Media Ready for Old Media?

The Size of the Future

(This is a guest post from a friend and long-time colleague, Robin Lubbock of WBUR, who will be contributing to Loose Wire Blog. You can read his blog, the Future of New(s), here.) Why don’t you buy hard-back books? Either they are too expensive, or too big. They are too big to comfortably hold in one hand. So if you’re sitting in bed trying to read you’ve got to find a way to prop the thing up. Not a hurdle you can’t overcome. But an inconvenience. Now think about the reader of the future. It’s the same issues. Size, readability, and cost. Any lessons you’veContinue readingThe Size of the Future

Beyond Information Delivery

Newspaper delivery guy, Jakarta 2007 Over at Loose Wire sister site ten minutes I just wrote a review of ShifD, a new Web 2.0 clippings service that works, in theory, between desktop and mobile. More interesting, I reckoned (quoting myself; sorry), is that it’s developed by two guys from within The New York Times’ R&D Lab, so you can’t help wondering where something like this might fit into the world of newspapers. I’d love to see, for example, a five-digit code at the end of each news story in my newspaper/magazine that I could key into my phone and which would then store a copyContinue readingBeyond Information Delivery

Google Earth as Harbinger of Doom

Researchers are using Google Earth, the New York Times/IHT reports, to look for evidence of giant tsunamis, signs that the Earth has been hit by comets or asteroids more regularly, and more recently, than people thought: This year the group started using Google Earth, a free source of satellite images, to search around the globe for chevrons, which they interpret as evidence of past giant tsunamis. Scores of such sites have turned up in Australia, Africa, Europe and the United States, including the Hudson River Valley and Long Island. Chevrons are huge deposits of sediment that were once on the bottom of the ocean; theyContinue readingGoogle Earth as Harbinger of Doom

Domain Names as a Tool for Political Control?

A case that addresses all sorts of issues, and, at the same time, none of them. Reuters.com reported a few days ago that The authorities in Kazakhstan, angered by a British comedian’s satirical portrayal of a boorish, sexist and racist Kazakh television reporter (Borat Sagdiyev ), have pulled the plug on his alter ego’s Web site. Sacha Baron Cohen plays Borat in his “Da Ali G Show” and last month he used the character’s Web site www.borat.kz to respond sarcastically to legal threats from the Central Asian state’s Foreign Ministry. A government-appointed organization regulating Web sites that end in the .kz domain name for KazakhstanContinue readingDomain Names as a Tool for Political Control?

Enter Kinja, The New Blog Directory

Here’s another blog directory, going live today (it’s just a graphic at the time of writing this). Is it going to be different, or is it hype? The New York Times today says Kinja, “automatically compiles digests of blogs covering subject areas like politics and baseball. Short excerpts from the blogs are included, with links to the complete entries on the individual blog sites.” Users can sign up for a free account, enter the addresses of their favorite blogs and generate a digest. Those behind Kinja include Nick Denton, “whose small blog-publishing empire includes the New York gossip site Gawker” according to The Times, andContinue readingEnter Kinja, The New Blog Directory

The Digital Fallout Of Journalistic Plagiarism and Fakery

How do you correct the Internet? All these reports of plagiarism and fakery in U.S. journalism — at least 10, according to the New York Times — raise a question I haven’t seen addressed elsewhere. What should newspapers and other publications which have carried the reports do about setting the record straight? A USA Today report says of disgraced reporter Jack Kelley that it has “found strong evidence that Kelley fabricated substantial portions of at least eight major stories, lifted nearly two dozen quotes or other material from competing publications, lied in speeches he gave for the newspaper and conspired to mislead those investigating his work.”Continue readingThe Digital Fallout Of Journalistic Plagiarism and Fakery

Can Software End Plagiarism?

With all this gadgetry, you’d think that plagiarism was a thing of the past. OK, it wasn’t plagiarism, more like fiction, but the point is the same: Watching Shattered Glass, the movie about fabulating New Republic ‘journalist’ Stephen Glass, the other night, I couldn’t help wondering why no one had picked up on his lies earlier. I mean this was 1998, so the Internet existed, search engines existed. (The only solution I could reach was that the people who read The New Republic were not that bright, but that can’t be right, it’s the inflight magazine of Air Force One.) Anyway, according to Editor &Continue readingCan Software End Plagiarism?

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