Tag Archives: Tesco PLC

Want Some Wi-Fi In Your Shopping Cart?

Amazing how Wi-Fi has come, in three or so years, from a very obscure and slightly geeky thing to something supermarkets sell, both in terms of devices and services.

Robert Jaques of VNUNet today reports that Linksys “will begin marketing a special line of wireless networking products for home users at selected Tesco superstores in the UK”. Linksys, the report says, is “the only consumer networking vendor in all three of the world’s top retailers, i.e. Tesco, Wal-Mart and Carrefour”.

A piece in this month’s Grocery Headquarters magazine, meanwhile (yes, I read it all the time) says “the supermarket industry is starting to use wi-fi cafes to drive incremental sales and customer loyalty one latte at a time”. Supermarkets in the U.S., the report says, are using their own wireless LANs to offer customers Wi-Fi. Wegmans Food Markets is already testing the technology in two Pennsylvania stores. Quality Food Centers (QFC), a division of Cincinnati-based Kroger Co., offers shoppers wi-fi access in half a dozen stores in the state of Washington.

Soon Wi-Fi will just be something that everyone has, everyone expects, and nobody pays for. Just as it should be.

Update: Gillette Said To Abandon Tag Trials

 From the This Sounds Like A Good Thing, Or Are We Being Luddites? Dept comes news that privacy protests against the trial of RFID tags by Gillette at a Tesco store in Cambridge have prodded Gillette to abandon their trial, according to Indynews. RFID (Radio Frequency ID) tags are small tags containing a microchip which can be ‘read’ by radio sensors over short distances.
 
 
Recent trials involving attaching these tags to products have raised concerns about privacy, as information on the tag could be read long after the product was purchased. Tesco is also testing RFID tags in its DVD range at the Extra store in Sandhurst, Berkshire.

News: Buy Some Razor Blades And Get Your Photo Taken!

 Yes, it’s true! All you need to do is pick up a packet of Gillette Mach3 razor blades at Tesco’s in Cambridge, England, and you’ll trigger a CCTV camera. A second camera takes a picture at the checkout and security staff then compare the two images. Apparently the aim of the trial, The Guardian reports, is to provide stock information, but the manager of the store has already described how he presented photos of a thief to police.
 
 
Retailers have hailed the technology as the “holy grail” of supply chain management but civil liberties groups argue that the so-called “spy chips” are an invasion of consumers’ privacy and could be used as a covert surveillance device.