Tag Archives: Stanford University

Anti-Phishing Passwords

An obvious but effective technique against phishing, here: altering each password so it’s tied to the domain name of the site. Then, if you’re trying to sign in to a phishing fake site, the password won’t match and won’t work. Here’s the story from InformationWeek – Stanford Computer Scientists Unveil New Anti-Phishing Software :

A pair of Stanford University computer science professors unveiled today a new password scheme designed to thwart phishing at bank and other sites where a user’s identity and money are at risk. Dubbed PwdHash, the technique involves hashing the user’s password with the domain name of the site in a way that ensures that the target site is the real one, and not a site designed by phishers to capture user information.

Here’s the site itself.

Google and The Future Of Libraries

Will all libraries eventually be digital?

Seems a pretty obvious question (answer: yes) but the process is surprisingly slow. I do research online and use databases like Questia but there’s still a hell of a lot that hasn’t been made available. And a lot of what is scanned has not been scanned well, unless the original material contained a lot of misspelled names.

Anyway, here’s a glimpse of what may be happening soon. From the excellent OnlineJournalism.com Newsletter — the daily news Weblog of the USC Annenberg Online Journalism Review — is a link to a report from CyberJournalist.net, which in turn “keyed in on an anonymous tip buried deep inside a Sunday New York Times feature” on Google and Microsoft: “Apparently Google plans to digitize every post-1923 [[correction: should be pre-1923; makes more sense. Thanks Jim]] text within the Stanford University Library, creating an enormous copyright-free resource available solely to Google users. The ambitious operation is codenamed Project
Ocean, according to The Times’ unnamed source.”

Wow. That’s about 18 libraries, ranging from the Art and Architecture Library to the Linear Accelerator Center Library (although that link doesn’t work, which doesn’t augur particularly well…)

This on top of Google Print blurb search and Amazon’s Inside the book search (both are shameless links to postings on this very site.)