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Carrier IQ’s Opt-Out Data Collection Patent

ZDNet writes here about an Carrier IQ patent that outlines keylogging and ability to target individual devices . Which is interesting. But Carrier IQ owns a dozen patents, including this one, which to me is much more interesting. This patent indicates what Carrier IQ software could do—not what it does—but it is revealing nonetheless: A communication device and a data server record and collect events and event-related data to create an activity record. A user of the communication device may request that events and related data be recorded and collected using a configuration option on the communication device or through an interaction with the dataContinue readingCarrier IQ’s Opt-Out Data Collection Patent

Singapore Details ‘Waves’ of Cyberattacks

Officials and delegates from APEC economies were targeted ahead of last year’s Singapore meeting with malware-laden emails faked so they appeared to have been sent by Singapore government officials on the Organising Committee. Singapore officials have said the attacks were not the first on the country. Although Singapore regularly highlights threats to national security—including Islamic terrorism—the admission that it has been the victim of cyber attacks is, according to the Straits Times, its most detailed account. Although it’s hard to read too much into the statements made to judge who may have been behind the attacks, it’s interesting that Singapore is drawing attention to this—notContinue readingSingapore Details ‘Waves’ of Cyberattacks

Nightmare on Spyware Street

A case in Connecticut has exposed the legal dangers of not protecting your computer against spyware, as well as our vulnerability at the hands of incompetent law-enforcement officers. Teacher Julie Amero found herself in a nightmare after spyware on her school computer popped up pornographic images in front of students. Instead of realising this was spyware at work, the state accused her of putting them there and forcing her pupils to watch. In June of 2007, Judge Hillary B. Strackbein tossed out Amero’s conviction on charges that she intentionally caused a stream of “pop-up” pornography on the computer in her classroom and allowed students toContinue readingNightmare on Spyware Street

links for 2008-09-15

About GroupLens | GroupLens Research GroupLens is a research lab in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Minnesota. We conduct research in several areas (tags: minnesota collaboration recommendations social) iRider Web Browser Product Overview – Wymea Bay a browser that’s been doing all this stuff the others are starting to do a long time ago. (tags: browser software) WikiMindMap Great tool for converting a Wikipedia entry into a mind map that you can then export to Freemind. Useful for showing the uninitiated how mindmaps work, and how powerful they are. (thanks Roy of Topicscape for the link) (tags: wikipedia visualizationContinue readinglinks for 2008-09-15

Is That a Virus on Your Phone or a New Business Model?

This week’s WSJ.com column (subscription only) is about mobile viruses — or the lack of them. First off I talked about CommWarrior, the virus any of you with a Symbian phone and Bluetooth switched no will have been pinged with anywhere in the world. CommWarrior isn’t new: It has been around since March 2005. But this isn’t much comfort if you find yourself — as a lunch companion and I did — bombarded by a dozen attempts to infect our phones before the first course had arrived. So is CommWarrior just the thin end of a long wedge? Yes, if you listen to the Internet-security industry. “I canContinue readingIs That a Virus on Your Phone or a New Business Model?

When Chatbots Go Bad

Richard Wallace of the A.L.I.C.E. AI Foundation, Inc. and creator of the Alice chatbot says his creation (sorry, can’t find a permalink) may have been lured to the dark side: I have received a multitude of emails recently from subscribers to MSN Instant Messenger services, from people who have chatted with a clone of ALICE on their system who have suspected that this clone is downloading spyware onto their machines. The threat of malicious bots releasing viral software has appeared before, but this is the most serious incident so far. Like many clones of ALICE, this one appears to contain the basic AIML content containingContinue readingWhen Chatbots Go Bad

Microsoft’s Spyware Gate

Microsoft have launched a new version of their Antispyware application, now rebuilt and renamed Windows Defender. Initial reports are favorable, including Paul Thurrott, who is good on these kind of things: Windows Defender Beta 2 combines the best-of-breed spyware detection and removal functionality from the old Giant Antispyware product and turns it into a stellar application that all Windows users should immediately download and install. Lightweight, effective, and unobtrusive, Windows Defender is anti-spyware done right, and I still consider this to be the best anti-spyware solution on the market. Highly recommended. Expect this program to become part of the next Windows operating system, meaning thatContinue readingMicrosoft’s Spyware Gate

Keeping the Keyloggers out of the Basement

Here’s a product about to be announced that claims to really protect users against keylogging — when bad guys capture the keystrokes you make and then transmit it back to base: StrikeForce’s WebSecure (PDF file): The basic idea, StrikeForce’s PR guy Adam Parken tells me, is that “keystrokes are encrypted at the hardware driver and delivered directly to the browser.” This, he says, “gets around the OS, messaging service, etc. where keyloggers normally hide.” It looks a bit like this (from a WebSecure presentation): If that makes any sense. The grey boxes are the bits in between the keyboard and the network, and they’re allContinue readingKeeping the Keyloggers out of the Basement

The Smell of Sterile Burning

There’s a growing noise about Sony’s apparent attempt to install digital rights management software usually associated with bad guys trying to maintain control of a compromised computer: Mark’s Sysinternals Blog: Sony, Rootkits and Digital Rights Management Gone Too Far: The entire experience was frustrating and irritating. Not only had Sony put software on my system that uses techniques commonly used by malware to mask its presence, the software is poorly written and provides no means for uninstall. Worse, most users that stumble across the cloaked files with a RKR scan will cripple their computer if they attempt the obvious step of deleting the cloaked files.Continue readingThe Smell of Sterile Burning

ZoneAlarm’s Impressive About-turn, Or How To Do Blog PR Right

A day ago I vented my disappointment at a sneaky marketing gambit inside ZoneAlarm’s otherwise excellent free firewall software, which scared the user into running an external spyware scanner in the hope of getting them to upgrade. This morning I received word from their PR department that this promotion “has been turned off. The wording was not optimal, and we sincerely regret any inconvenience or frustrations it caused our users. Also, your story has prompted us to create a new approval process for any outbound promotions including multiple departments, to ensure that we maintain the highest integrity in our marketing efforts.” I’m very impressed. I’m not suggestingContinue readingZoneAlarm’s Impressive About-turn, Or How To Do Blog PR Right

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