Site Overlay

Visualizing England’s Woes

I hope I’m proved wrong in this case, but this is a visualization that does what any great visualisation should: it lets you find your own story. In my case I’m convinced that England’s football woes lie in the fact that not only do foreigners squeeze the natural wellspring of talent in the domestic game, but that those English players that do thrive have so little experience of any other leagues—save a few games a season in European competitions—that they’re shorn of any real breadth to their play. Here’s a chart that illustrates these two facts brilliantly. The first illustrates how many other countries’ squadsContinue readingVisualizing England’s Woes

Firefox’s Billion, Amazon’s Misstep, and Facebook’s Hole

Here’s another appearance on Radio Australia’s Breakfast Club, now called something else, which after a hiatus is back on every Friday—around 1.15 GMT. Here’s the audio of the segment (about 10 minutes’ worth). Here’s what I talked about: My own experiences at the hands of Facebook’s disabling team. Lawsuit: Amazon Ate My Homework – Digits – WSJ how a student is blaming Amazon for deleting his notes on 1984 Firefox Approaches 1 Billion Downloads, Could Hit It Tomorrow Actually by now it’s nearly there.

Facebook Wants to Be Twitter, While Twitter May Have to Be More Like Facebook

Here’s another appearance on Radio Australia’s Breakfast Club which is pretty much every Friday—around 1.15 GMT—and here are some links to the things I talked about this week. Here’s the audio of the segment (about 10 minutes’ worth). Facebook’s move to be more like Twitter. As I said on the show, Facebook fears that its network lacks room for growth; when was the last time you added a friend? Marketers find Twitter. Australian company uSocial will go out and get followers for you, for a price. This isn’t underhand, but already twitter is becoming a place for spammers (from Habitat to the sleazeballs who won’tContinue readingFacebook Wants to Be Twitter, While Twitter May Have to Be More Like Facebook

The Cup Final, the Uplifting Video and the iPod

Hang on, let me check my iPod first Technology, however small, can be the difference between winning a cup final and losing it. Manchester United faced Tottenham Hotspur in the Carling Cup Final on Sunday, and it’s instructive how video technology was, in a way, the difference between the two sides. After no goals in 120 minutes, there was nothing between the sides, and it came down to a penalty shoot-out. (Each take five.) Now I’m a Tottenham fan, if that means anything to you, so this is painful to relate, but it’s striking. The Spurs manager, old school Harry Rednapp, had got his staffContinue readingThe Cup Final, the Uplifting Video and the iPod

Radio Australia topics, Nov 7

I make an appearance on the excellent Breakfast Club show on Radio Australia each Friday at 01:15 GMT and some listeners have asked me post links to the stuff I talk about, so here they are. Follow football on your cellphone through vibrations: a team in Scandavia has come up with a way to convey movement of a ball via vibrations. This would allow folks wanting to follow a soccer game with the phone in their pocket, in theory. This is how it would happen, as far as I can understand it: someone would watch a game and input data whenever the ball was kicked.Continue readingRadio Australia topics, Nov 7

Website Members Take Over Football Club

A new model of football ownership? The BBC website reports that Fans’ community website MyFootballClub has agreed a deal to take over Blue Square Premier outfit Ebbsfleet United. The 20,000 MyFootballClub members have each paid £35 to provide a £700,000 takeover pot and they will all own an equal share in the club. Members will have a vote on transfers as well as player selection and all major decisions. What’s interesting is that the website has only been going since April. It has 50,000 members, 20,000 of them paying the registration fee. MyFootballClub was actually approached by nine of them clubs, none of them fromContinue readingWebsite Members Take Over Football Club

Soccer 2.0

  Photo: The Offside In Soccer 1.0 the manager is king. But an Israeli football team is experimenting with a sort of crowd-sourcing, wisdom-of-the-Kop type approach, where fans monitor the game online and suggest starting line-up, tactics and substitutions. Reuters reports from Tel Aviv that “diehard football fan Moshe Hogeg was so upset when star striker Lionel Messi was left off Argentina’s side for a World Cup match against Germany last year that he teamed up with an online gaming company to buy a club where fans decide over the Internet who will play and in what position.” Hogeg’s company, an Israeli social network forContinue readingSoccer 2.0

How to Play Football With Nails and Popsicle Sticks

Well, actually if you do that you’ll be infringing a patent. I love reading patents, but I rarely understand them. This one I do, since it uses words I understand, like ‘roofing nails’ and ‘elastic bands’: clipped from patft.uspto.gov A board game for at least two individuals to play. The board game is a modified form of soccer that uses roofing nails pounded into a flat surface as “players,” a marble as a soccer ball, and a pair of Popsicle sticks as shooters. In addition, an elastic band is wrapped around into a rectangular fashion to have a rectangular-shaped playing field.

Europe’s Top-heavy Leagues

 Spanish Primera Liga (48%)  German Bundesliga (54%)  English Premier League (47%)  French Ligue 1 (47%)  Greek Ethniki Katigoria (6%)  Dutch Eredivisie (25%)  Italy Serie A (24%)  English Championship (29%)  Scottish Premier League (29% This doesn’t have a lot to do with technology, but it’s an excuse to play around with sparklines, Edward Tufte’s approach to feeding data into text in the form of small data-rich graphics. And they might tell us a bit about soccer, competitiveness and which country is the powerhouse of Europe. (These ones are done with Bissantz’ excellent Office plugin.) What started me off here was the comment on the BBC website that EnglishContinue readingEurope’s Top-heavy Leagues

The World Cup Changes

Maybe it’s cos I don’t follow other sports as slowly, but this World Cup is beginning to feel like a media watershed in several different — and surprising — ways. First off, the supply of World Cup footage to YouTube, and “live” commentary by cellphone from those in the stadium to those outside threatens to overturn the tight FIFA controls on coverage and sponsorship. FIFA stewards can stop people wearing clothing or carrying banners that don’t support the official sponsors, but they can’t keep people’s cellphones out of the stadium. Can they? Secondly the best writing has come from blogs, not from the traditional sportsContinue readingThe World Cup Changes

Copyright © 2020 loose wire blog. All Rights Reserved. | Catch Sketch by Catch Themes