Obese Texters, Back to the Future, and Scams

I make an appearance on the excellent Breakfast Club show on Radio Australia each Friday at about 01:15 GMT and some listeners have asked me post links to the stuff I talk about, so here they are. Texting reduces obesity If your kids are getting a little overweight, then treat them to a bit of …

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links for 2008-09-24

Technology Review on the downside of Remote Technology But STG also encountered the dark side of that mechanical facility after deploying a hot-water system in a small village in Lesotho. Four to five months after they left, Mueller says, the system broke down after people scavenged it for parts. (tags: devtech failure developingworld appropriatetechnology) How …

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links for 2008-09-14

BBC NEWS | Science/Nature | Taxi drivers ‘have brain sat-nav’ If using your brain to navigate makes it bigger and better, than what does using satnav and other technologies do for it? (tags: transport neuroscience navigation brain) India Se Online As Non-Resident Indians (or NRIs) we are among the most educated and highest earning ethnic …

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links for 2008-09-10

Footnote – The place for original historical documents online Footnote.com is a place where original historical documents are combined with social networking in order to create a truly unique experience involving the stories of our past. (tags: web2.0 search resources library history)

The Predictable Human (and a Privacy Issue)

A study of mobile phone data shows that we are extraordinarily consistent about our movements. Mobile phone data, unsurprisingly, provides rich pickings for researchers since we carry one around with us all the time, and, unlike dollar bills, it’s more likely to stick with one person. But some have questioned the ethics of such a …

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A Beginner’s Guide to Scanning

(This is the text of my weekly Loose Wire Service column, written mostly for newcomers to personal technology, and syndicated to newspapers like The Jakarta Post. Editors interested in carrying the service please feel free to email me.) A lot of folk ask me whether they should buy a scanner: those things that take bits …

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CAPTCHA Gets Useful

An excellent example of something that leverages a tool that already exists and makes it useful — CAPTCHA forms. AP writes from Pittsburgh: Researchers estimate that about 60 million of those nonsensical jumbles are solved everyday around the world, taking an average of about 10 seconds each to decipher and type in. Instead of wasting …

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How to Pack Right

Here’s a piece I wrote for the latest issue of DestinAsian magazine on travel strategies for uncertain times (I have a regular column called Tech Travel in the travel magazine): The way we travel will continue to change, and we will need to adapt to it, especially when it comes to the technology that tethers us …

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Translate This

I’m a sucker for this kind of thing: Translator Boomerang (thanks, Satya), which translates from English into a foreign language and then back again, just for laughs, really (I suppose one could say something pompous about how this reflects the difficulty of translation etc.): Google Translator Boomerang is a silly little program that uses the Google …

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The Problem With Surveys

I love BBC World, the satellite news channel, and I love offering feedback (rarely welcome, as readers will know). In the hope of satisfying both passions I joined the BBC World Panel where “users are invited to register and record their comments online and to take part in regular surveys and questionnaires specifically on viewing …

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