Site Overlay

Google Suggest: Your Company + Scam

I find that the auto suggestions feature from Google Suggest in the Firefox search box very useful. But perhaps not in the way it was intended. Google Suggest works via algorithms that “use a wide range of information to predict the queries users are most likely to want to see. For example, Google Suggest uses data about the overall popularity of various searches to help rank the refinements it offers.” In other words,  type one word and Google will tell you the next word most likely to be typed after it. Type “dimitar” and the most likely second word will be “berbatov” (this may notContinue readingGoogle Suggest: Your Company + Scam

Escape to Streetlevel

Next up: cities you can drive through, and not from above, or fake worlds where everyone has big chests. Real cities, from all angles. It’s called EveryScape. The company calls it “the world’s first interactive eye-level search that offers Web users a totally immersive world on the Internet.” A “virtual experience of all metropolitan, suburban and rural areas in which visitors can share their stories and opinions about real-life daily experiences against a photo-realistic backdrop ranging from streets and cities, communities, restaurants, schools, real estate and the like.” Yes, I’m not crazy about the lingo, but the idea is a cool one: Just try theContinue readingEscape to Streetlevel

From the Ashes of Blue Frog

The Blue Frog may be no more,  but the vigilantes are. Seems that despite the death of Blue Security in the face of a spammer’s wrath, the service has built an appetite for fighting back. Eric B. Parizo of SearchSecurity.com reports on a new independent group called Okopipi who intend “to pick up where Blue Security left off by creating an open source, peer-to-peer software program that automatically sends “unsubscribe” messages to spammers and/or reports them to the proper authorities.” Okopipi has already merged with a similar effort known as Black Frog and has recruited about 160 independent programmers, who are dissecting the open sourceContinue readingFrom the Ashes of Blue Frog

Cellphone Bubbles And The Virtual Tribe

Looking for something else on the Net I stumbled upon this five-year-old piece from Jonathan Rowe in Washington Monthly, Reach Out And Annoy Someone. Some good stuff in there, but I particularly liked some stuff he wrote about Hong Kong, about the ‘lonely bubble’ of the cellphone user in public: And what does that suggest about where this “communications revolution” is taking us? When I was in Hong Kong a year and a half ago, it was becoming a cell-phone hell. The official statistics said there was one phone for every two people, but it often felt like two for one. They were everywhere; theContinue readingCellphone Bubbles And The Virtual Tribe

Sparking The Wi-Fi Revolution

Glancing at the charts on JiWire’s newlook website of the top 10 Wi-Fi countries and cities, I wondered whether it was worth taking a closer look at the figures to see if there’s any conclusions we could draw about the wireless revolution. The figures only include those commercially available hotspots, as far as I can figure out. But they’re still interesting. In sheer numbers London is way ahead with more than 1,200 hotspots, followed by Tokyo (904) and New York (851) . But all these cities are different sizes. How about hotspots per capita? Taking populations of the metropolitan areas of these cities things lookContinue readingSparking The Wi-Fi Revolution

WSJ.com – Russian Sites Sell Song Downloads For Pennies, But Are They Legal?

Good piece today on WSJ.com by Vauhini Vara about the legality Russian MP3 download sites like allofmp3.com: Russian Sites Sell Song Downloads For Pennies, But Are They Legal? (subscription only). Vauhini quotes lawyers as saying “buying music from the sites is as illegal as downloading it for free over a file-swapping network. “It doesn’t matter if somebody downloads in the U.S. and believes that it’s legal because the site tells them so,” says Evan Cox, an intellectual property lawyer at the firm Covington & Burling in San Francisco.” Elsewhere in the story, Vauhini quotes Peter Necarsulmer, president of the Coalition for Intellectual Property Rights, a Washington,Continue readingWSJ.com – Russian Sites Sell Song Downloads For Pennies, But Are They Legal?

Could The Fake Beheading Have Been Proven Earlier?

I know it’s easy to be smart after the event, but were there enough clues on the Internet for journalists to have figured out the Benjamin Vanderford video was a fake before AP and others published the news? There were some clues, at least. From the video we were able to know his name and his home town, even his home address. From that checks on Google would have thrown up the following at the very least: Him, or someone with the same name, was running for office:  A piece on The Examiner website on May 31 mentions “Benjamin Vanderford, 22-year-old political independent, musician and video-game programmer” as being aContinue readingCould The Fake Beheading Have Been Proven Earlier?

Wi-Fi For The Masses

I’ve been working on a story about Wi-Fi for the masses in Asia (it will be appearing in this week’s Far Eastern Economic Review; I’ll post a snippet when it comes online), looking at how Wi-Fi is opening up all sorts of opportunities to leap over the traditional problems of the rural and urban poor in this part of the world: A lack of basic infrastructure, such as roads and phone lines. It’s a great topic with some inspring characters turning talk into action. As a follow-up, here’s an interesting piece from Robert X. Cringely, who last week pointed out that with an all-in-one router costingContinue readingWi-Fi For The Masses

Marketers Baffled By Spam Laws

This new spam law, so far, is taking us nowhere. A new survey conducted by email marketing service Blue Sky Factory reckons that nearly half of email marketers aren’t sure whether the stuff they send out is compliant and more than half admit that they do not understand the new U.S. laws (called, catchily but inaccurately, CAN-SPAM). Marketers, needless to say, aren’t happy: almost 40 percent do not believe the new laws will have a positive influence on the online relationship between businesses and their consumers. (A PDF version of the survey is available here.) This seems to be the prevailing view at a conferenceContinue readingMarketers Baffled By Spam Laws

News: Segway’s First Hit And Run

 A Segway rider in San Francisco hit a 3-year-old girl while riding — illegally — on one of the city’s sidewalks, ABC reports. The man fled the scene (on his Segway).     The police says it expects to be able to quickly track down the suspect by contacting Segway, and obtaining a list of San Francisco Segway owners. Apparently there aren’t that many.

Copyright © 2020 loose wire blog. All Rights Reserved. | Catch Sketch by Catch Themes