Tag Archives: Prime Minister

The Context of Content, in the Back of a Fast-moving Cab

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I was reading The Wall Street Journal in a cab on a BlackBerry just now and I realised what’s wrong with print media. It still hasn’t got that not everything is going to be read in a newspaper.

See this story about Gordon Brown. It might look good as the main story on the front page, but it looks and reads all wrong pretty much anywhere else:

U.K. Prime Minister Gordon Brown, beset by scandals and sniping from within his own party, on Wednesday faced a battle for political survival just two years after ascending to the country’s top post.

Mr. Brown’s fortunes, already slumping in recent months amid Britain’s deep recession, have spiraled downward in recent days, hit by a series of political nightmares. Several top officials in the government of Mr. Brown’s ruling Labour Party have been caught up in the embarrassing revelations about dubious expenses claimed by U.K. politicians of all stripes.

And it goes on it that vein for another dozen paragraphs. They’e all good paragraphs—I know, I’ve written or edited hundreds like them over 20 years–earnestly written and no doubt earnestly edited by a bevy of subs. But they’re not contextual to me, in the sense that they’re not how I want to get my information bumping along in a cab driven by a guy arguing with his wife on the phone at 10 pm on a Thursday evening.

Why not? Well, the truth is that this style of writing—thoughtful, ponderous, with lots of subordinate clauses–is stuck in the dark ages of journalism. Valiant efforts at freshness—beset, sniping, political survival, ascending, top post, fortunes, slumping, amid, spiraled, downward, hit, political nightmares, caught up, embarrassing revelations, dubious, all stripes—sound turgid and forced, merely highlighting how far journalistic writing has departed from the way that we speak.

Not that we ever really spoke like this, but in the old days it didn’t matter. Because then news was scarce, and us journalists were like monks/nuns or doctors, permitted our own way of communicating. And the pomposity of a newspaper somehow made pompous language more fitting.

But nowadays this sort of writing just looks, frankly, archaic. And because it’s so far from the way we speak, it is unsuited for the way that we likely read it—on BlackBerrys, on the net, on scrolling tickers, on Tweetdeck.

The language of journalism, in short, needs to catch up with the fact that we consume it now in dozens of different ways. A self-respecting radio or TV editor would re-write copy so it sounds realistic when spoken. Why is the same not being done for newspaper content?

Contextualized content—in every sense–is the future of media, I have no doubt. But some of that has to do with making the actual content something that is suited to the device upon which it’s being absorbed. A smart editor should be rewriting this stuff so that it sits well on the devices it is being pushed to.

The value of content lies, in part, in its sensitivity, for want of a better word, to the environment in which it is devoured (OK, consumed, but I try to avoid that word.)

If you don’t believe me try reading a good blog post on a portable device, and then compare it to something like the above.

U.K.’s Brown Faces Battle for Political Survival – WSJ.com

Counting the Words

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I’ve been looking recently at different ways that newspapers can add value to the news they produce, and one of them is using technology to better mine the information that’s available to bring out themes and nuances that might otherwise be lost. But does it always work?

The post popular page on the WSJ.com website at the moment is Barack Obama’s speech, which has dozens of comments added to it (not all them illuminating; but there’s another story.) What intrigued me was the text analysis box in the text:

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Click on that link and you see a sort of tag cloud of words and how frequently they appear in the text of the piece itself. Mouse over a word and a popup tells you how many times Obama used the word. “Black,” for example, appears 38 times; “white” appears only 29. That’s nearly 25% fewer times.

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Interesting, but useful? My gut reaction is that it cheapens a remarkable speech–remarkable not because of its views, but remarkable because it’s a piece of oratory that could have been uttered 10, 20, 50, maybe even 100 years ago and still be understood.

My point? Analyzing a speech using a simple counter is not only pretty pointless–does the fact he said ‘black’ more times than ‘white’ tell us anything? What about the words he didn’t use?–but it paves the way to speechwriters running their own text analysis over speeches before they’re spoken. “Hey, Bob! We need to put more ‘whites’ in there otherwise people are going to freak out!” “OK how about mentioning you were in White Plains a couple of times last year?”

Maybe this already happens. But oratory is an art form: it doesn’t succumb to analysis, just as efforts to subject Shakespeare to text analysis don’t really tell us very much about Shakespeare.

The Journal is just messing around, of course, experimenting with what it can to see what might work. We’re merely watching a small episode in newspapers trying to be relevant. And it should be applauded for doing so. But I really hope that something more substantial and smart will come along, because this kind of thing not only misses the mark, but is in danger of quickly becoming absurd.

Perhaps more important, it fails to really add value to the data. Without any analysis of the frequency of words, there’s not really much one can say to the exercise except, maybe, “hmmm.” Compare that with a Canadian research project a couple of years back which developed algorithms to measure spin in the 2006 election there. They looked at politicians’ use of particular words: “exception words” — however, unless — for example, and the decreased use of personal pronouns–I, we, me, us– which might imply the speaker was distancing him- or herself from what was being said.

That sounds smart, but was it revealing? The New Scientist, writing in January 2006, said the results concluded that the incumbent, Prime Minister Paul Martin, of the Liberal Party, spun “dramatically more than Conservative Party leader, Stephen Harper, and the New Democratic Party leader, Jack Layton.” Harper, needless to say, won the election.

Oh, and in case you’re interested, Shakespeare used the word “black” 174 times in his oeuvre, according to Open Source Shakespeare, and “white” only 148, 15% fewer occurrences. Clearly a story there.

Thaksin Needs Your Help


For those of you who thought the former Thai prime minister Thaksin Shinawatra was living it up in Europe buying soccer teams, you’re wrong. He’s having serious financial problems and needs your help, according to this email I just received in his name:

Good day.

This may appear a bit surprising to you but very sensitive; as a matter of urgency, I am desperately looking for a foreign partner whom I can trust to handle some investment or fund movement under is control for security reasons. I am Mr. Thaksin Shinawatra, Former Thailand Prime Minister, I went on exile for some months over allege assassination of me and my family, and was charge for corruption and purchasing of Government lands. They also confiscate (froze) my 21 bank accounts, wealth and money I deposited with a bank firm in Thailand,

See the web link for more details:
http://www.voanews.com/burmese/2007-06-16-voa4.cfm

I have pleaded to be allowed to live freely, and with dignity, but Mr. Surayud has urge my assassination when returned to my own land for abusing the rule of law, been the current Prime Minister in power I have known objection than to remain on exile. While in exile, I have decided to move the fund I deposited with a security firm here in Europe for a reliable business purpose and also gain access to fully support the less privilege which the government of my country is against. I am calling your attention for partnerships deals towards assisting me invest this fund under your custody for security purpose till the accusation levy against me is cleared off.

All further communication of this transaction would be referred to my lawyer in your next mail to scrutinize the legitimacy of my partner (you), and also assign to you the legal protocol and modalities of this transaction.

Yours Sincerely,
Mr. Thaksin Shinawatra
thakshinw@tiscali.co.uk

Please see what you can do. Of course, there’s an off-chance this could be one of those scams, but I’ve read it carefully and checked the VOA link, and it rings true to me. Really.

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Cyberwar, Or Just a Taste?

Some interesting detail on the Estonian Cyberwar. This ain’t just any old attack. According to Jose Nazario, who works at ARBOR SERT, the attacks peaked a week ago, but aren’t over:

As for how long the attacks have lasted, quite a number of them last under an hour. However, when you think about how many attacks have occurred for some of the targets, this translates into a very long-lived attack. The longest attacks themselves were over 10 and a half hours long sustained, dealing a truly crushing blow to the endpoints.

There’s some older stuff here, from F-Secure, which shows that it’s not (just) a government initiative. And Dr Mils Hills, who works at the Civil Contingencies Secretariat of the UK’s Cabinet Office (a department of government responsible for supporting the prime minister and cabinet), feels that cyberwar may be too strong a term for something that he prefers to label ‘cyber anti-social behaviour’.

Indeed, what surprises him is that such a technologically advanced state — which uses electronic voting, ID cards and laptop-centric cabinet meetings — could so easily be hobbled by such a primitive form of attack, and what implications that holds:

What IS amazing is that a country so advanced in e-government and on-line commercial services has been so easily disrupted. What more sophisticated and painful things might also have already been done? What else does this indicate about e-security across (i) the accession countries to the EU; (ii) NATO and, of course, the EU itself?

Definitely true that this is probably just a little blip on the screen of what is possible, and what governments are capable of doing.

(Definition of Cyberwar from Wikipedia here.)

 

SkypeIn And Miscalls

Just got my first SkypeIn miscall! That was fun. A guy called Christian, calling a guy called Simon, somewhere in the UK, but got my UK SkypeIn number. Simon, he’s only going to be there until five pm.

That was fun! Could I be the first? I feel that the least we should do is to be more polite and helpful on miscalls. Should I call Christian back and tell him he dialled the wrong number? Or should I put his number on my blog so someone else can do it?