Tag Archives: pornographic Web

Who Is Really Behind The Rogue Dialer Scams?

A tip from a reader (thanks, James) indicates we’re back on the trail of the rogue dialers. (Rogue dialers are pieces of software usually downloaded without the user’s knowledge, which then disconnect existing Internet connections and dial fresh connections via high-cost usually international numbers. The user doesn’t know much about it until the monthly phone bill arrives with a hefty jump.) A piece on TheWMURChannel (via AP) says Missouri’s attorney general has filed suit against a New Hampshire man, Michael Walczak,  and his businesses —  Phoenix One Billing LLC and National One Telecom Inc — accusing him “of charging Missourians for accessing pornographic Web sites they never visited”:

The suit accuses Walczak of demanding payment from at least 59 Missouri customers for long-distance calls to foreign countries that weren’t made and for accessing pay-per-view adult Web sites. Nixon said it appeared the charges sometimes came from auto-dialing software installed on people’s computers without their knowledge.

Walczak is accused of deception, fraud and unfair trade practices. Nixon wants the Jackson County Circuit Court to order the people wrongly charged be paid back, to block Walczak from engaging in unfair trade practices and to impose a fine of $1,000 per violation.

Walczak doesn’t sound like a big fish, although National One, one of the companies he is allegedly involved in, did catch some big ones. This article in the Union Leader describes him thus (go here for the full piece; the January original has been archived):

Walczak is a 2000 graduate from Manchester West High School and uses his parent’s Horizon Drive address in Bedford as his business address. He graduated from Daniel Webster College last year with a degree in information systems. John Zahr, a class officer of the West 2000 class, said Walczak was a smart kid who took advanced-level classes. “All I could really tell you, without trying to sound too harsh, was that he was perceived as your stereotypical high school ‘nerd,’ if you will,” Zahr said in an e-mail message.

In other words, if this account is correct, he’s barely into his 20s. Someone of his name is also behind this website, Candid Publishing, based in the same area, with the following DNS registration data:

 Walczak, M. webmaster@candidpublishing.com
 PO BOX 10007
 Bedford, NH 03110
 US
 1-866-422-6343

Different postbox, but same ZIP as Phoenix One Billing. And the company name happens to be the name by which National One Telecom’s DNS is registered. Candid Publishing’s website has nothing on it, but it looks cool, and promises services including “traffic auditing”. But it does seem to have been around a while: the Walczak of Candid Publishing has been using that company name since at least 2000. Oh, and there’s an interesting exchange here on the Tech Support Guy forums between angry users and a National One Telecom “customer service manager“. It’s more than a year old but entertaining and may shed some light on what this is all about. Could this particular scam have been dreamed up and carried out by small fry?

Biometrics Close To The Bone

Further to my column about fingerprint biometric scanners (subscription only ), I’ve heard from  a company working on a different kind of biometric security: Via the bone.

Last week, Mass.-based RSA Security Inc. (the guys who make the SecurID number tag, called ‘a two-factor user authentication system’ in the jargon) announced a joint research collaboration with Israel’s i-Mature, specialists in ‘online age recognition’. The two vow to bring together RSA Security’s cryptographic expertise and i-Mature’s Age-Group Recognition (AGR) technology to “work towards a unique solution that would genuinely improve the safety of the Internet for children, by enabling both adult and children’s sites to restrict their content more reliably to their appropriate audience”:

i-Mature has developed an innovative technology that can determine, through a simple biometric bone-scanning test, whether a user is a child or an adult – and thereby control access to Internet sites and content. AGR technology could help prevent children from accessing adult Internet sites and prevents adults from accessing children’s sites and chat rooms.

As far as I understand it, users wanting to visit a website would be required to press their fist against a small scanner, which would work out whether they are 18 or above, or 13 or younger, and then determine, based on software installed at the website itself, whether they are old enough to visit it:

Although the i-Mature website focuses not on confirming the identity of the user but his/her age group, the press release suggests that RSA’s involvement would fact bring some verification: The project would bring a “unique combination of technologies verifying that the person accessing the age-appropriate site is in fact who they claim to be,” the release says.

Obvious benefits? No need for the website itself to know who the user is or keep any data on them, since the scan is simply confirming age-group. Users can’t transfer their passwords or authentication tag to someone else (unless, I guess, if they happen to be around and ‘fist’ themselves into the computer for another user). Also not much work for the parent or teacher to set things up. It might prove popular with public Internet access, since providers might be able to use to limit underage surfing to a select number of websites.

Downsides? The website the person visits needs to have software installed to match the fist-tag. While some pornographic sites, for example, are going to be delighted to conform and limit access, I can’t imagine all of them are. And how many porn websites are there out there at any given point?

I assume RSA and (the rather oddly named) i-Mature are going to limit their targets to chat-rooms and more general websites, rather than the pornographic web. Indeed, the press release suggests as much: “The collaboration will include joint research as well as joint marketing activities around age-group recognition, including market education and engagement with government policy makers.”

Indeed, i-Mature has set its sights more broadly than the net: The press release says:

The protection and safety of children is also required outside the Internet arena. The AGR system complies with this since it is also compatible with mobile phones, television, video and DVD systems that can use AGR technology to prevent children from viewing harmful content. i-Mature can also partner with developers of computer games, online games and video games to block extremely violent and un-educational materials.

Sounds like something worth watching.