The rebirth of RSS?

This is a column written for the BBC World Service (here’s the show.). Views are my own, and do not represent those of my employer, Thomson Reuters.  I’ve been wrong about a lot of things, but I’ve been particularly wrong about something called RSS. RSS is a simple standard, dreamed up during the halcyon days …

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In Malaysia, online election battles take a nasty turn

Jahabar Sadiq of The Malaysian Insider Here’s a piece I did from KL on Saturday ahead of Sunday’s election. It was pushed out ahead of the poll for obvious reasons but it might have a broader interest in how the battle for influence over online media has evolved in Malaysia, with relevance elsewhere.  May 4 …

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The Blogging Revolution is Over, But That’s Not the Point

I was digging through some of my old columns the other day, trying to see if I had predicted anything right. Here’s what I had to say 10 years ago this month, about a new and still obscure habit called blogging: I’d like to think that blogs do what the much vaunted portal of the …

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The Toolbar Community

I’m really intrigued by the return of the toolbar. Only now it’s not a toolbar. It’s more of a ribbon that appears in your browser on certain sites. Facebook started it but have oddly put it at the bottom of the screen: Facebook Connect, which I was so rude about yesterday, extends this idea. NYT …

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Beyond Information Delivery

Newspaper delivery guy, Jakarta 2007 Over at Loose Wire sister site ten minutes I just wrote a review of ShifD, a new Web 2.0 clippings service that works, in theory, between desktop and mobile. More interesting, I reckoned (quoting myself; sorry), is that it’s developed by two guys from within The New York Times’ R&D …

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User Determined Computing

I’m not sure it’s a new phenomenon, but Accenture reckons it is: employees are more tech savvy than the companies they work for and are demanding their workplace catches up. A new study by Accenture to be released next week (no link available yet; based on a PR pitch that mentions no embargo) will say …

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The Economics of Journalism

Daniel Harrison at the The Global Perspective takes issue with my post about media companies no longer being about content and all about the medium. He makes a fair point, and it’s a good thoughtful post (I’ll forgive him getting my name wrong), concluding that “it is misleading to get side-tracked into a debate on …

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Has PR Taken Over The Conversation?

Here’s the hot news for a Monday: PR firm Edelman has teamed up with Technorati to develop localized versions of their offering in German, Korean, Italian, French and Chinese. Edelman’s PR teams worldwide will retain exclusive use of these sites as they are being developed, beginning with French this summer. These localized versions – which …

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“There will be podcasts for an audience of one and podcasts for an audience of one billion”

To accompany my column this week on podcasting (which will appear here when it’s out; subscription only I’m afraid), here’s a snippet from an IM interview with Cameron Reilly of The Podcast Network on podcasting: Jeremy: How about the big picture: What might people be using podcasts for in the future? And why has such …

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