Tag Archives: Major

Did Prolexic Fend Off Anonymous’s Sony Attacks?

Prolexic, a company that defends clients against Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks, says it has successfully combatted the “Largest Packet-Per-Second DDoS Attack Ever Documented in Asia”:

“Prolexic Technologies, the global leader in Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) mitigation services, today announced it successfully mitigated another major DDoS attack of unprecedented size in terms of packet-per-second volume. Prolexic cautions that global organizations should consider the attack an early warning of the escalating magnitude of similar DDoS threats that are likely to become more prevalent in the next 6 to 8 months.”

Although it describes the customer only as “an Asian company in a high-risk e-commerce industry” it could well be connected to the recent attacks on Sony by Anonymous. A piece by Sebastian Moss – The Worst Is Yet To Come: Anonymous Talks To PlayStation LifeStyle — in April quoted an alleged member of Anonymous called Takai as reacting to unconfirmed reports that Sony had hired Prolexic to defend itself (Sony Enlists DDoS Defense Firm to Combat Hackers):

“It was expected. We knew sooner or later Sony would enlist outside help”. Pressed on whether Anonymous would take out Prolexic, Takai showed confidence in the ‘hacktavist’s’ upcoming retaliation, stating “well, if I had to put money on it … I’d say, Prolexic is going down like a two dollar wh*** in a Nevada chicken ranch  ”. He did admit that the company “is quite formidable” and congratulated “them for doing so well”, but again he warned “We do however have ways for dealing with the ‘Prolexic’ factor”.

The website also quoted Anonymous members expressing frustration at the new defences, but that they appeared to be confident they would eventually prevail. That doesn’t seem to have happened.

Prolexic’s press release says the attacks had been going on for months before the client approached the company. The size of the attack, the company said, was staggering:

According to Paul Sop, chief technology officer at Prolexic, the volume reached levels of approximately 25 million packets per second, a rate that can overwhelm the routers and DDoS mitigation appliances of an ISP or major carrier. In contrast, most high-end border routers can forward 70,000 packets per second in typical deployments. In addition, Prolexic’s security experts found 176,000 remotely controlled PCs, or bots, in the attacker’s botnet (robot network). This represents a significant threat as typically only 5,000-10,000 bots have been employed in the five previous attacks mitigated by Prolexic.

It does not say why it considers the attack over, now gives any timeline for the attack. But if it is Sony, it presumably means that Anonymous has withdrawn for now or is preoccupied with other things. Prolexic, however, is probably right when it warns this is a harbinger of things to come:

“Prolexic sees this massive attack in Asia with millions of packets per second as an early warning beacon of the increasing magnitude of DDoS attacks that may be on the horizon for Europe and North America in the next 6 to 8 months,” Sop said. “High risk clients, such as those extremely large companies in the gaming and gambling industries in Asia, are usually the first targets of these huge botnets just to see how successful they can be.”

Is SPIM Another Non-Problem?

No. It is a real problem, if only because there’s still plenty of sleazy people figuring out new ways to ruin your day.

There’s some skepticism out there about this new spam threat: SPIM, in case you didn’t know, is spam that’s delivered, not to your inbox, but to your instant messaging chat program, like ICQ. Some folk say it’s a problem.  Yankee Group, according to a recent report, estimates that currently five to eight percent of all instant messages are spam generated by automated bots. Others are more skeptical. Greg Cher on thespamweblog points out that he’s “been on all three of the major IM’s for at least years and have never…ever had a problem with ‘spim’.”

I was skeptical too, until I today saw these programs being peddled via PRWeb: ”ICQPromoter is a powerful tool for sending messages to thousands of Online or Offline ICQ users. Audience can be targeted by specific interests, country, city, occupation, age, gender or language.” The company behind this, Nanosoft Inc. of Milpitas, California, also offer:

  • Admessenger (“a feature-rich direct advertising program designed to deliver your messages directly to upto 2 Billion Windows 2000, XP, and NT desktops…It is like showing Banner Advertisement with paying a single penny”)
  • Yahoo Answering Machine (“Serves as Perfect Advertising Machine and Advertisement Machine. You can send Message in Room after Predefined time. Send PM to all users in Current Chat Room.”)

You get the idea. These programs will basically spam large numbers of people using chat messengers, or Yahoo chat rooms, all of them automated. What would be amusing if it weren’t so dumb is the fact that Nanosoft prominently display their “zero-tolerance policy” towards Spam. “If you have found this website due to spam, please let us know,” they say. Presumably that doesn’t include using the products they sell?

On closer inspection, Nanosoft have some other rather sleazy products on display. How about this for size: Shadow Pooper [sic], which will, unknown to the user, “periodically open new browser (in fullscreen mode) and load your ad page.” And just in case that’s not intrusive enough for you, “it also can change users Homepage in browser to any URL you choose.” Helpfully, the blurb says “All you need, is to force user install your application on his PC. Use your imagination. Advertise your application as free xxx-dialer, internet booster, etc… You can even include it in installation pack with other free software.” So now we know how spyware works.

Then there’s the problem that Google have come across: The way that advertising via pay-per-click can be abused. Nanosoft offer this: the Traffic Blaster/ URL Generator which will “allow you to generate a massive amount of traffic to any website you wish. Affiliate sites, Banner Sites, Exit Exchanges, and the list goes on and on.” To be honest, I’m not clear from the blurb exactly how this works. Definitely worth a closer look though.

Ironically, these are the same guys selling Popup blockers, chat encrypters, privacy protecters and evidence eliminators. Which brings me back to an earlier post on the question: How can you buy software to protect your privacy from folk you don’t trust? (And I couldn’t help noticing that Nanosoft don’t really trust their customers. This message appears on their website: Because of the growing incidences of Internet fraud, we log everything and take it very seriously. All the fraudulent transactions will be reported to FBI’s Internet Fraud Complaint Center (IFCC).” Right.)

Software: Grokster Goes Pro

 If you haven’t heard of it before, it sounds like something painful that happens to a guy in his mid 40s, or a vital piece of plumbing under the sink, but Grokster is actually a file-sharing program, and it’s going pro. From its haven in the West Indies, the company has released a $20 version “in response to a growing user demand and willingness to pay for a version of the software that is void of annoying pop-up ads and the cluster of optional software  programs that accompany all of the major P2P software clients on the market today.” (In English that means the free version that everyone uses now comes with lots of pesky ads and snooping software to annoy you while you download pirated music illegally.)
 
 
Grokster last April won a suit brought against it by the RIAA and the MPAAand has, it says, “since secured its position as one of the world’s most popular software programs and has established a brand name known around the globe, boasting users in every country on earth.” I don’t want to get into the ethics and legality of MP3 swapping, but it strikes me that if folk are exchanging music for free online, they’re not likely to be the kind of folk to want to shell out $20 for software. And if they are, they can hardly plead poverty for their piracy, can they? Or am I missing something?