My Technology-free Lunch

At lunch today, it took me some time to realise what was different. It wasn’t just that my four lunch partners were all quite a bit older than me–15 years, at least, and I’m not as young as you think I am. It was, I realised, that in more than two hours of eating not …

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Tony’s Camera

Tony’s Camera Originally uploaded by Loose Wire. How many people, I wonder, have had this experience: a nightmare with a smartphone and a return to trusty basics. My friend Tony has a BlackBerry, but this is his phone of choice, and after his N91 died in midflight (literally) he decided he wouldn’t take a chance …

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User Determined Computing

I’m not sure it’s a new phenomenon, but Accenture reckons it is: employees are more tech savvy than the companies they work for and are demanding their workplace catches up. A new study by Accenture to be released next week (no link available yet; based on a PR pitch that mentions no embargo) will say …

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Crying Out for Clarity

Interesting post and thread at Signal vs Noise on the overuse of buzzwords, particularly on job applications. One thing caught my eye, though: the assumption that shorter, briefer is better. One commenter wrote: “I’ve always noticed that the shortest emails come from those with the most power in the organization.” That’s probably because they’re using …

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The Demise of the Considered Response

It’s my rather pompous term for the way that email, SMS and, in particular, the SlackBerry [sic] reduce the quality of our replies. Nowadays, it seems, a prompt one-line answer to an email is considered somehow more productive, efficient, effective and “smart” than actually contemplating for a moment the subject and the best response. However …

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The Future of Paper

The Observer has an interesting piece on the future of the book. For some the future of the book is electronic: [Bloomsbury chairman Nigel] Newton is certain that ‘within seven to 10 years, 50 per cent of all book sales will be downloads. When the e-reader emerges as a mass-market item, the shift will be very …

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Betting on Widgets

An interesting use of the KlipFolio desktop widget thing: Live Soccer Odds on Your Desktop The free Live Soccer Odds Desktop Alert available now here, is the latest development in a comprehensive Gambling Guru Networks service that helps players more quickly find precisely what they are looking for and gives them access to live soccer …

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Ebay to buy Skype: It’s Official

eBay Inc. has agreed to acquire Luxembourg-based Skype Technologies SA, the global Internet communications company, for approximately $2.6 billion in up-front cash and eBay stock, plus potential performance-based consideration. Here’s the rest of the release: The acquisition will strengthen eBay’s global marketplace and payments platform, while opening several new lines of business and creating significant …

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Phishing Gets Smaller, Smarter

It’s intriguing how phishers are targeting smaller and smaller groups. Not only does it indicate that the bigger banks and institutions are becoming more secure (or their customers smarter) but it indicates that the phishers must be employing increasingly sophisticated methods of harvesting email addresses. Or is there something else afoot? The Bakersfield Californian yesterday reported …

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The Moleskine Report, Part V

Further to my postings and column on the Moleskine notebook, here’s one final emai linterview with Patrick Ng, Hong Kong-based host of the upcoming Moleskine Art competition. I reproduce it in its entirely because Patrick has a very fresh and direct way of articulating the problem, and the solution: There is currently no substitute for …

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