Tag Archives: Houston

Twitter in Indonesia

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Interesting to see how Twitter is catching up on the main news [Google Trends data] portal in Indonesia, detik.com. (Although actually detik.com has the largest number of followers in Jakarta, at least according to twitaholic. (With only 87,755, that doesn’t sound right somehow. Surely there are more popular Indonesian twitterers out there?)

Twitoaster, which collects data on where people are twittering from, suggests that Twitter is pretty active across most of the major cities. Back in January Sysomos listed Indonesia as 6th in terms of the number of twitter users, the biggest in Asia. Their previous report, in June 2009, didn’t feature Indonesia in the top 17. There are more twitterers in Jakarta than in Houston or Boston. Given the rise since, Indonesia must be higher still.

This piece by Hera Diani looks at the impact this is having on Islam.

VoIP and 911

An interesting case in Texas that highlights the weak spot in the whole VoIP thing:  Net Phone Firm Vonage Sued Over 911 Access, reports the LA Times:

As two gunmen forced their way into her Houston home Feb. 2, Sosamma John yelled to her daughter, Joyce, to call the police. Joyce ran upstairs, grabbed the phone and dialed 911. Instead of getting a police dispatcher, the frantic teen got a recording telling her that 911 wasn’t available from the family’s phone.
Joyce escaped the house to call from a neighbor’s — but not before the gunmen had shot her parents and fled.

On Tuesday, the state of Texas sued Vonage Holdings Corp., the nation’s largest Internet-based phone service provider, for allegedly failing to make clear that 911 calls weren’t included in a basic subscription.

The lawsuit highlights a challenge for the exploding business of Internet-based telephone service: Consumers attracted by the cheap rates may be giving up full access to emergency operators.

It also shows Internet phone companies and federal regulators, who are taking a hands-off approach to so-called voice over Internet protocol service, that state authorities are willing to step in with consumer-protection laws at their disposal.

It’s hard to imagine that VoIP services couldn’t provide some sort of emergency access, so perhaps this might be a blip. Or else it’s the thin end of a regulatory wedge that makes the whole cheap phone call thing a flash in the pan.

Windows’ Gaping, Seven Month Hole

Quite a big hooha over this latest Microsoft vulnerability, and I readily ‘fess up to the fact that I didn’t really take this seriously. Seems like I wasn’t the only one.

But folk like Shawna McAlearney of SearchSecurity.com points out that the delay of 200 days between Microsoft being notified and their coming out with a patch is appallingly long. “If Microsoft really considered this a serious or critical vulnerability for nearly all Windows users, it should have been a ‘drop-everything-and-fix’ thing resolved in a short period of time,” Shawna quotes Richard Forno, a security consultant, as saying. “Nearly 200 days to research and resolve a ‘critical’ vulnerability on such a far-reaching problem is nothing short of gross negligence by Microsoft, and is a direct affront to its much-hyped Trustworthy Computing projects and public statements about how security is playing much more important role in its products.” Strong stuff.

So what is all the fuss about? The vulnerability in question can, in theory, permit an unauthenticated, remote attacker to execute arbitrary code with system privileges: That means a ne’er do well could do anything they want in your computer. And while it hasn’t happened yet, to our knowledge, it’s only a question of time, according to Scott Blake, vice president of information security at Houston-based BindView Corp.: “We believe attacks will be conducted remotely over the Internet, via e-mail and by browsing Web pages. We expect to see rapid exploitation — it’s simply a case of when it materializes.”

Paul Thurrot, of WinNetMag, weighs in with his view, pointing out that the flaw is a very simple one: “attackers can compromise the flaw with a simple buffer-overrun attack, a common type of attack that Microsoft has wrestled with since its Trustworthy Computing code review 2 years ago.”

News: The Explanation Behind All Those Attacks?

 It seems that there’s a purpose behind the viruses we’ve all been getting: old-fashioned extortion. Reuters reports that extortionists — many thought to come from eastern Europe — have been targetting casinos and retailers, but one recent high-profile victim was the Port of Houston. The attacks, which can cripple a corporate network with a barrage of bogus data requests, are followed by a demand for money. An effective attack can knock a Web site offline for extended periods.
 
Online casinos appear to be a favorite target as they do brisk business and many are located in the Caribbean where investigators are poorly equipped to tackle such investigations. Police said because of a lack of information from victimized companies, they are unsure whether these are isolated incidents or the start of a new crime wave.
 
Last week, the online payment service WorldPay admitted to suffering a major DDoS attack that lasted three days. WorldPay, owned by the Royal Bank of Scotland, has been fully restored. The NHTCU spokeswoman said the investigation into the WorldPay is ongoing.