Tag Archives: George Gordon Byron 6th Baron Byron

Get off my TiddlyTagCloud

For those of you interested in the whole TiddlyWiki thing, Clint Checketts has just pointed me to his new creation: the TiddlyTagCloud – a simple visualization of active tags, which list the existing tags in a TiddlyWiki alphabetical order and displays the more popular tags larger.

And here, just in case you didn’t see it, is a post on TiddlyWikis I made as a guest blogger on the Blog Business Summit ‘05. Thanks, Byron, for inviting me.

Multimedia Kristof

Nicholas Kristof did a great piece in yesterday’s NYT on blogging in China and its impact — death by a thousand blogs — on the government. But what’s particularly impressive is the multimedia package he’s put together for the piece. Check out the link on the left hand side of the page. It includes websites, audio commentary, some great photos and some footage. Nice work. (Thanks, Byron)

The Slashdot Report Part I

This week’s column is about The Slashdot Effect, (subscription only, I’m afraid) which I’ll mention in more detail in subsequent postings. This first supplement is about the commercial potential of blogs, and a case study those of you reading blogs will probably already know about:

Is it possible to harness this new kind of information flow for business ends? You bet. But it’s not easy. Here’s one success story, and it has as much to with patience and luck as budgets. DL Byron, principal of Seattle-based of website designer Textura Design Inc, came up with an idea for a better way to seal plastic bags – the Clip-n-Seal. He used Clip-n-Seal’s own blog to talk about the product, and told one or two of his blogging friends, who blogged and told their friends, until one day they hit the mother lode: Boing Boing, and two similar other big directory sites. Retail sales went through the roof, but that was just the beginning. “Great for traffic,” Byron recalls, ” but what really happened was a new market found us that we never anticipated.” As Clip-n-Seal climbed the Google search page ranks, industrial customers discovered them and suddenly organizations from crime scene policemen to biomedical companies were placing orders. Byron’s conclusion: Better to spend time on getting noticed in the blogosphere than spend money on traditional advertising. “I can say from our experience that a blog post will outsell a ad. Guaranteed.”