Tag Archives: Gawker.com

Sleazy Linkers Lose An Ally

Seems as if there’s a bit of a groundswell building against internal links, which I got all upset about a few months ago. (internal linking is where you place a link on a word like, say, Google, but instead of actually linking to Google you link to another page on your own blog about Google.) Amit from Digital Inspiration points out that

Valleywag, the Silicon Valley gossip blog that everyone hates but still reads, always practiced excessive internal linking but good sense prevailed at Gawker and they have suddenly changed that habit.

Amit also points to Shane at the Daily Telegraph, who is complaining about the same practice. Etre.com points out how brazen TechCrunch are at doing it, but points out that Mashable and Engadget continue to do so.

I find it personally annoying because I tend to drag links into PersonalBrain or elsewhere and expect a link that says ‘Flock’ to go to Flock. But it’s also dishonest, like putting an EXIT sign over a door in a shop which instead goes into another part of the shop. It’s against the principles of the net, and, frankly, tells me that something is wrong in the state of Web 2.0 if this kind of thing is considered acceptable or even good practice.

What to do? Maybe a name-and-shame list until these recalcitrants start respecting the intelligence of their readers?

A Lesson from Valleywag – Good Linking Etiquettes | India Inc.

Blogged with Flock

Tags: , , , ,

Enter Kinja, The New Blog Directory

Here’s another blog directory, going live today (it’s just a graphic at the time of writing this). Is it going to be different, or is it hype?

The New York Times today says Kinja, “automatically compiles digests of blogs covering subject areas like politics and baseball. Short excerpts from the blogs are included, with links to the complete entries on the individual blog sites.” Users can sign up for a free account, enter the addresses of their favorite blogs and generate a digest.

Those behind Kinja include Nick Denton, “whose small blog-publishing empire includes the New York gossip site Gawker” according to The Times, and Meg Hourihan, Kinja’s project director and a founder of the blog publishing service Blogger. (Her blog is here.)

Kinja users can make their customized digests public, NYT says, and that the best digests would be promoted at the site, making the users ”part of the editorial team.”

There’s definitely room for improvement in the way blogs, and RSS feeds, are pulled together for the reader. Reading blogs, even in RSS form, becomes quite a chore, and while there are some great blogs out there, the tendency of the most interesting ones to cover a very broad spectrum of topics makes sifting through sometimes more time-consuming than one would like. Here’s an interesting discussion about what Kinja could be, and what people are looking for.