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Boingling Along

Another social annotation tool, this time called Boingle, put together by Greg Martin, who writes: Boingle is a stripped down social annotation system that lets you annotate within web pages with the result being a simple markup (“Boingles (2)”) that looks as though it belongs in the page, much as a link titled “Comments (4)” looks normal within a blog. It is very understated in nature, and lets the annotation content itself be the star. Social annotation, in case you’ve not done it, is a method to leave comments (annotations) on web pages so others can see them when they visit. It’s mildly popular, thoughContinue readingBoingling Along

HP Blogger Deletes Another Customer Comment

A few days ago I wrote about HP’s censoring, and then uncensoring, of a comment to its blog. The removal of the comment caused a furore and led to the HP blogger, David Gee, apologising and acknowledging the good learning experience: This was a good learning experience for us and we strive to maintain honest and open communication with our customers. If we are going to use blogging as a legitimate connection between us and our customers, we need to choose either to be in all the way or out. We choose to be in. We want to hear from you. Kudos to them, butContinue readingHP Blogger Deletes Another Customer Comment

Website Annotation Is Back?

Techdirt points to an effort by Slate’s Paul Boutin  to Make Website Annotation Cool Again. As Techdirt points out, this idea — where surfers can add their comments to websites so that others who use the same annotation software can view them, and add their own comments — is not new. (The semi-official term is Web Annotation.) I went back through my old columns and saw that it was exactly five years ago that I wrote about ThirdVoice, which (according to c2) stopped offering its service, in part because of complaints, a year later. Others were uTok, Instant Rendezvous and Gooey, all of which seemContinue readingWebsite Annotation Is Back?

More On Plaxo

Further to my outburst about Plaxo, and the suggestion that people you don’t know can add their contacts to your Outlook address book without your permission, I’m pleased to see that someone from Plaxo has added their comments (at the bottom of that posting). I’ve also received a more detailed response from someone in Plaxo’s privacy department, which I shall go through and summarise in a later posting. Suffice to say I’m not yet convinced of the argument that it’s a simple question of the user’s (i.e. my) error. I’ll explain later; it’s not a simple issue. But thanks, Rikk, for taking the trouble toContinue readingMore On Plaxo

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