Google Maps and Rising Sea Levels

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Is Google Maps getting radical? Switch into terrain mode and you can see what the future is going to be like. The screenshot above shows the northeast tip of Singapore, much of it underwater.

This is what it looks like in Map mode:

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No doubt a glitch that is soon to be fixed, but

a) I’m not quite clear what the glitch is. Old elevation data? and

b) you can’t help feeling it would be a great feature to have a “10 years’ time” button to see whether you should be thinking about selling up and moving to higher ground. Especially if you live in Changi Village.

Google’s New Interface: The Earth

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I’ve written before about how I think Google Earth, or something like it, will become a new form of interface — not just for looking for places and routes, but any kind of information. Some people call it the geo-web, but it’s actually bigger than that. Something like Google Earth will become an environment in its own right. I can imagine people using it to slice and dice company data, set up meetings, organize social networks.

Google is busy marching in this direction, and their newest offering is a great example of this: Google Book Search. This from Brandon Badger, product manager at Google Earth:

Did you ever wonder what Lewis and Clark said about your hometown as they passed through? What about if any other historical figures wrote about your part of the world? Earlier this year, we announced a first step toward geomapping the world’s literary information by starting to integrate information from Google Book Search into Google Maps. Today, the Google Book Search and Google Earth teams are excited to announce the next step: a new layer in Earth that allows you to explore locations through the lens of the world’s books.

Activating the layer peppers the earth with little yellow book icons — all over the place, like in this screenshot from Java:

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Click on one of the books and the reference will pop up, including the title of the book, its cover, author, number of pages etc, as well as the actual context of the reference. Click on a link to the page

Is it perfect? No. It’s automated, so a lot of these references are just wrong. Click on a yellow book in Borneo and you find a reference in William Gilmore Simms’ “Life of Francis Marrion” to Sampit, which is the name of a town there, but it’s likely confused with the river of the same name in South Carolina.

Many of the books in Google’s database are scanned, so errors are likely to arise from imperfect OCR. Click on a book above the Java town of Kudus, and you get a reference to a History of France, and someone called “Ninon da f Kudus”, which in fact turns out to be the caption for an illustration of Le Grand Dauphin and Ninon de l’Enclos, a French C17 courtesan.

But who cares? By being able to click on the links you can quickly find out whether the references are accurate or not, and I’m guessing Google is going to gradually tidy this up, if not themselves then by allowing us users to correct such errors. (So far there doesn’t seem to be a way to do this.)

This is powerful stuff, and a glimpse of a new way of looking, storing and retrieving information. Plus it’s kind of fun.

Google LatLong: Google Book Search in Google Earth

Escape to Streetlevel

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Next up: cities you can drive through, and not from above, or fake worlds where everyone has big chests. Real cities, from all angles. It’s called EveryScape.

The company calls it “the world’s first interactive eye-level search that offers Web users a totally immersive world on the Internet.” A “virtual experience of all metropolitan, suburban and rural areas in which visitors can share their stories and opinions about real-life daily experiences against a photo-realistic backdrop ranging from streets and cities, communities, restaurants, schools, real estate and the like.” Yes, I’m not crazy about the lingo, but the idea is a cool one: Just try the preview of San Francisco’s Union Square.

Using a Flash-enabled browser you move through the terrain and ground level (in the middle of the street), and then can tilt your view through all angles. You can click on certain markers for more information, or enter certain buildings. You “window shop storefronts as well as tour the inside of those stores, see their offerings, and access published reviews and other information.” You can add content such as “relevant links, personal reviews, rankings” and things like “a “For Rent” sign and an apartment tour.”

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Putting the stuff together doesn’t sound as hard as you would expect. EveryScape’s HyperMedia Technology Platform means anyone with an SLR camera can take pictures and upload them; EveryScape hopes to tap “into local communities and users to assist in building out a visual library of content that will cover the entire world.” A sort of Google Earth at ground level.

Great idea, though of course you can imagine there’ll be a lot of commercial elements to all this. It’s hard to imagine ordinary Joes allowed to plaster streets with their virtual graffiti or anything else that gets in the way of advertising opportunities. The only other concern I have off the top of my head is that Google Earth made some of us wonder whether, after seeing every corner of the globe from a bird’s wing, we’d feel the same urge to travel. Now, after wandering the virtual streets of San Francisco, would we lose our wanderlust?

EveryScape plans to launch 10 U.S. metropolitan areas this year.

Model Presidents, And An Updateable Heirloom

I’m a huge fan of The Atlantic Monthly, but sometimes I suspect it’s less for the articles and more for the ads. This month’s edition, for example, has two notable products up for grabs.

First, there’s the Toypresidents, limited edition 12″ talking action figures which are “not just electable, but collectable” (“Each collectible comes with its own individually numbered Certificate of Authenticity”). The ad in the mag includes a figure who could be more or less anyone, but turns out to be Bill Clinton. He says things like “Education is a critical national security issue and politics must stop at the school-house door”.

For $30 one is yours. Who would want one of these things? Apart from me, I mean. As the Christian Science Monitor reported last week, the dolls “demonstrate an American adage”: If you make it, someone will buy it.

That may well go for globes currently being advertised by Eureka Globes, which are both antique-looking enough to qualify as “heirloom quality” but also, apparently, “updateable” (“A removable pin releases the globe from the meridian for easy replacement”). Nothing like an heirloom that you can pass onto your grandchildren, confident that they can easily update it to reflect changes in geopolitical boundaries, loss of land-mass to global warming, etc etc..