The Blogging Revolution is Over, But That’s Not the Point

I was digging through some of my old columns the other day, trying to see if I had predicted anything right. Here’s what I had to say 10 years ago this month, about a new and still obscure habit called blogging: I’d like to think that blogs do what the much vaunted portal of the …

Continue reading ‘The Blogging Revolution is Over, But That’s Not the Point’ »

Technorati’s Decline, Death of Blogging?

Technorati Japan home page, Nov 2009 Technorati used to be one of the sites to see and be seen at. Your ranking there was highly prized; you’d add technorati tags to your blog posts and their State of the Blogosphere was a highly valued insight into blogging. But now it’s a pale shadow of its …

Continue reading ‘Technorati’s Decline, Death of Blogging?’ »

How to Monitor Your Flickr Album

The best way to keep tabs on who is linking to your Flickr photo album is through Technorati, the blog-tracking service. But it’s not as straightforward as it could be, so here’s a guide, based almost entirely on that provided by the Technology Evangelist Ed Kohler, for which I offer grateful thanks. Setting up the …

Continue reading ‘How to Monitor Your Flickr Album’ »

Sleazy Linkers Lose An Ally

Seems as if there’s a bit of a groundswell building against internal links, which I got all upset about a few months ago. (internal linking is where you place a link on a word like, say, Google, but instead of actually linking to Google you link to another page on your own blog about Google.) …

Continue reading ‘Sleazy Linkers Lose An Ally’ »

The Sleazy Practice of Internal Linking

It’s a small bugbear but I find it increasingly irritating, and I think it reflects a cynical intent to mislead on the part of the people who do it, so I’m going to vent my spleen on it: websites which turn links in their content, not to the site itself, but to another page on …

Continue reading ‘The Sleazy Practice of Internal Linking’ »

The End of Blogging Utopia

Blogs are great, but is it just a vast honeycomb of echo-chambers, where we talk to and listen to only those nearby? Author and funny guy David Weinberger comments on Ethan Zuckerman’s remarks (both interesting fellas, and well worth reading; David in particular an antidote to the relentless and humorless self-promotion of many A-list bloggers) …

Continue reading ‘The End of Blogging Utopia’ »

How to Really Read Blogs

People often ask me what blogs to read. So I thought I’d put together some thoughts on why some blogs are better than others, and how to get the most out of the blogs that you do read. There are five basic rules: Rule #1: A blog isn’t a publication. It’s a person The thing …

Continue reading ‘How to Really Read Blogs’ »

Is Old Media Killing Itself by Blogging?

Interesting point implicit in Technorati’s new State of the Live Web: as newspaper and other mainstream media use blogs more, does the public’s distinction between traditional journalism and blogging blur further? And if that happens, isn’t it counterproductive for old media to adopt blogs, since it erodes their distinctiveness and competitive advantage? In other words, …

Continue reading ‘Is Old Media Killing Itself by Blogging?’ »

Bloggers Bash Into Chinese Walls, Part XVI

Once again, the non-journalist end of blogging is finding that its world is surprisingly like the old world of media. TechCrunch, a widely read blog of things going on in the social media world of Web 2.0, has run into the kind of conflicts that traditional media grappled with (and are still grappling with) since …

Continue reading ‘Bloggers Bash Into Chinese Walls, Part XVI’ »

Asia’s Obsession With Lists

Last week the WSJ asked me to dig around for sites in Asia-Pacific that are building on the new Obsession with List making, as reported by Katherine Rosman. Here is the result (subscription only), and are some of the sites I came up with. I’d love to hear more from readers, as I’m sure I’ve …

Continue reading ‘Asia’s Obsession With Lists’ »