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Locking Users In the Smart Way

I was directed to this excellent piece, A Victim Treats His Mugger Right : NPR, via Facebook last night.  And it made me realise how publishers don’t make the most of that kind of referral. There’s plenty of evidence to suggest that nowadays we tend to get more and more of our reading from peer suggestions like this. Navigating News Online from the Project for Excellence in Journalism estimates that while Google still accounts for 30% of traffic to the main U.S. news sites, Facebook is the second or third most important driver of traffic. And yet all news sites do to respond to that is putContinue readingLocking Users In the Smart Way

Sharing on Evernote

Despite some competition, Evernote still owns the space where we save stuff we might need for ourselves. But is it up to the task of our increasingly collaborative world? I’ve gotten a bit confused about what can and can’t be synced and shared and with whom so I asked them. This is what I think I learned: (some corrections made after checking with Evernote) Syncing between devices If you’re a free user, anything you add on any device can be viewed (and edited) on any other device. If you’re a premium user then you’ll be able to download and store offline all notes to yourContinue readingSharing on Evernote

Social Media and Politics: Truthiness and Astroturfing

By Jeremy Wagstaff (this is a column I wrote back in November. I’m repeating it here because of connections to astroturing in the HBGary/Anonymous case.) Just how social is social media? By which I mean: Can we trust it as a measure of what people think, what they may buy, how they may vote? Or is it as easy a place to manipulate as the real world. The answers to these questions aren’t of academic interest only. They go right to the heart of what may be our future. More and more of our world is online. And more and more of our online worldContinue readingSocial Media and Politics: Truthiness and Astroturfing

Social Media and Politics: Truthiness and Astroturfing

(This is a longer version of my syndicated newspaper column) By Jeremy Wagstaff Just how social is social media? By which I mean: Can we trust it as a measure of what people think, what they may buy, how they may vote? Or is it as easy a place to manipulate as the real world? The answers to these questions aren’t of academic interest only. They go right to the heart of what may be our future. More and more of our world is online. And more and more of our online world is social media: A quarter of web pages viewed in the U.S.Continue readingSocial Media and Politics: Truthiness and Astroturfing

The Unfriending Wind of Unfriending

By Jeremy Wagstaff (this is my weekly syndicated column, hence lack of links. BBC podcast is here.) It’s an odd world where a word like “unfriending” becomes so common that we all know what it means. And we’re not thinking of unfriending in the old sense of hostile where Walter de la Mare would say Sighed not the unfriending wind, Chill with nocturnal dew, ‘Pause, pause, in thy haste, O thou distraught! I too Tryst with the Atlantic waste. By Atlantic waste, here, he’s not referring to the stream of Facebook updates that come your way. But he might have been, because it transpires thatContinue readingThe Unfriending Wind of Unfriending

Web 2.0 or Social Media? It Depends on the Year

A client asked me the other day what the difference was between social media, new media, digital media and Web 2.0. I told him: time. To see what I mean look at the following timeline from Google Trends: The blue line is searches of “social media” since 2004, orange is ”new media”, red “web 2.0” and green is “digital media”. Of course digital media can also include things like games, Flash and things where media is defined not so much as a means of delivering information but of a platform of expression. I guess the same could be said of new media. But what’s tellingContinue readingWeb 2.0 or Social Media? It Depends on the Year

Why Hotels Should Avoid Social Media

By Jeremy Wagstaff (this is a copy of my column for newspapers) If The Wall Street Journal is to be believed—and as a former contributor I’ve no reason to doubt it—the best way to get decent hotel service these days is to tweet about how bad it is. And reading the piece made me realize that, when it comes to an industry like the leisure industry, social media can only be a disaster for your brand. An article by Sarah Nassauer says that “hotels and resorts are amassing a growing army of sleuths whose job it is to monitor what is said about them online—andContinue readingWhy Hotels Should Avoid Social Media

Podcast: The War Over Privacy

This week’s podcast is from my weekly slot on Radio Australia Today with Phil Kafcaloudes and Adelaine Ng. This week we discuss privacy in the light of Facebook’s changes, the sale of Friendster, and one guy’s battle to delete his online past. To listen to the podcast, click on the button below. To subscribe, click here. Loose Wireless 091211 I appear on Radio Australia Today every Friday at about 9.15 am Singapore time (that’s 0.15 GMT/UTC.) There’s a live stream of the broadcast here, or find out your local frequencies here.

Social Netquirks

Each social network has its quirk. I want to fix them. Here’s how. Skype, for example, won’t let you be invisible to certain people. You’re either visible to all your buddies, or none at all. So if you have a contact who thinks a Skype connection is an open invitation to call you up out of the blue, there’s no way to discourage them other than by blocking. Which seems kinda harsh. Solution: A fake online button that takes calls but never quite connects them due to ‘network difficulties.’ Facebook has its quirks too. One is that it fails to recognise the vagaries of real-worldContinue readingSocial Netquirks

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