I’m An Airline, Fly Me

This an email from a bona fide airline: 

Dear Sir/Madam,

Please be informed that your transaction with [international carrier] has been confirmed. Due to fraud prevention procedure against Credit Card transaction, we would like to validate your recent transaction with [international carrier] by filling information below :

Passenger(s) name :
Route :
Date of Travel :
Cardholder name :
Address :

Also, we need to confirm and validate your name and last four digit of your card number. Please kindly provide scanned/image of your front side credit card that used to buy the ticket. You may cover the rest information on the card. Please reply in 8 hours after received this email or we will cancel the reservation.

Thank you for your cooperation.

Best Regards,
Verification Data Management

Ripe for Disruption: Bank Authentication

One thing that still drives me crazy, and doesn’t seem to have changed with banks, is they way they handle fraud detection with the customer. Their sophisticated algorithms detect fraudulent activity, they flag it, suspend the card, and give you a call, leaving a message identifying themselves as your bank and asking you to call back a number — which is not on the back of the credit card you have.

So, if you’re like me, you call back the number given in the voice message and have this conversation:

Hello this is Bank A’s fraud detection team, how can I help you today?
Hi, quoting reference 12345.
Thank you, I need some verification details first. Do yo have your credit card details to hand?
I do, but this number I was asked to call was not on the back of my card, so I need some evidenc from you that you are who you say you are first.
Unfortunately, I don’t have anything that would help there.

So then you have to call the number on the card, and then get passed from pillar to post until you reach the right person.

How is this still the case in 2016, and why have no thoughtful disruptive folk thought up an alternative? Could this be done on the blockchain (only half sarcastic here)? I’d love to see banks, or anyone, doing this better.

A simple one would be for them to have a safe word for each client, I should think, which confirms to me that they are who they say they are. It seems silly that they can’t give some information — it doesn’t even have to be private information — that would show who they are, but only a customer would know.

LinkedIn scam comes full circle, by pretending to be LinkedIn

LinkedIn don’t seem to be taking seriously the extensive use of their network by scammers, as I went on about here. Maybe this will make them change their mind: use of their own company in a scam profile (might not be up long, see screenshot.)

The Jeffrey Westwood in question is a stock photo from Thinkstock used in a number of places, such as this website focused on building sales leaders, and this insurance website.

I’m going to reach out to see whether LinkedIn are taking this kind of thing more seriously, given that not only could a simple algorithm catch these kinds of profiles, but that by using LinkedIn as his company the scammer should have set off other alarm bells somewhere in a LinkedIn cubicle (“Does anyone know this Jeffery Westwood fella?” “Nope. Must be new.”)

[Update: LinkedIn appear to have removed the profile in response to my query, but not answered my questions. Will try again.]