Too Far Ahead of the Curve?

My former employers used (I’m stressing used here ) to like my tech stories because they had never heard about the stuff I wrote about before, which was considered good. But in later years as the editors were replaced by other, saner heads, and there were grumbles. Write about what’s happening now, not what’s going …

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Windshift: Malware Recycled

A recently published deck (PDF) by Abu Dhabi-based DarkMatter’s Taha Karim draws an interesting conclusion: that an Indian cybersecurity group called Appin, active a few years ago, was either targeted by an advanced APT group (and its tools stolen), or its tools stolen by a rogue employee, or that its tools were sold to a …

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Microsoft, never sexy, grows up

By Jeremy Wagstaff We didn’t really notice it but the past week or so has seen the passing of an era. We are no longer in a world where Microsoft wants to peer through our Windows, as it were. As Ben Thompson noted in his Stratechery newsletter, the company’s recent Ignite Conference passed largely unnoticed …

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For the tech hubs of the future, look to Asia’s smaller cities

This is an update on a piece I’d written for Reuters six years ago on remote freelancing in emerging markets. It was written in part for a new Cisco report on Technology and the future of ASEAN jobs (PDF), launched this week at WEF.   Much of the disruptive change in Southeast Asia in the …

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Solving the Tragedy of the Commons

  (edited for clarity) Bike sharing has become something of a plague for those who don’t appreciate its advantages. Even for those who do, the sight of bikes lying all over the place, broken, is jarring in a place like Singapore. But the solution is not obvious. First off, you need to have a mechanism …

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Bank scammers get smart(er)

Scammers still love the telephone. It’s the best way to scam people because you have got them there, in the palm of your hand, so to speak. Banks are slowly getting to grips with this and warning customers not to give personal details over the phone to anyone claiming they’re from a bank. Check the …

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Bike Fencing

Some interesting stuff going on in Singapore’s world of bike sharing. They’re approaching the problem of errant bike-parking by regulating the companies via a licensing regime, which will begin later this year, according to Today. From what I can make of it, operators must – be licensed, or face a S$10,000 fine and/or six months …

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Disrupting Travel Disruption

easyJet seem to be taking an interesting, if not pioneering, approach to disruptive tech. While fintech has mostly absorbed the wave of startups that went after the financial industry from about 2011, travel startups initially went after the middlemen, creating a host of algorithm-based disintermediators, and put a lot of travel agents out of business.  …

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Investigators – New Kids on the Blockchain

Here’s a Reuters piece I wrote on a hitherto uncovered area of blockchain potential — helping law enforcement and others collaborate and collect evidence better, among other things.  For security agencies, blockchain goes from suspect to potential solution By Jeremy Wagstaff, Byron Kaye (Reuters) – Police and security agencies have so far only taken an …

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The Internet of Things Could Kill You, Or At Least Jab You With A Screwdriver

  Lucas and his killer robots. Photo: JW (This is the transcript of my BBC World Service piece which ran today. The original Reuters story is here.)  I’m sure you’ve seen those cute little humanoid robots around? They’re either half size, or quarter size, they look like R2D2, and if you believe the ads, they …

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