BBC – Cybercrime: One of the Biggest Ever

My contribution to the BBC World Service – Business Daily, Cybercrime: One of the Biggest Ever

Transcript below. Original Reuters story here

If you think that all this cybersecurity stuff doesn’t concern you, you’re probably right. If you don’t have any dealings with government, don’t work for an organisation or company, and you never use the Internet. Or an ATM. Or go to the doctor. Or have health insurance. Or a pension.

You get the picture. These reports of so-called data breaches — essentially when some bad guy gets into a computer network and steals information — are becoming more commonplace. And that’s your data they’re stealing, and it will end up in the hands of people you try hard not to let into your house, your car, your bank account, your passport drawer, your office, your safe. They may be thieves, or spies, or activists, or a combination of all three.

And chances are you won’t ever know they were there. They hide well, they spend a long time rooting around. And then when they’ve got what they want, they’re gone. Not leaving a trace.

In fact, a lot of the time we only know they were there when we stumble upon them looking for something else. It’s as if you were looking for a mouse in the cellar and instead stumbled across a SWAT team in between riffling through your boxes, cooking dinner and watching TV on a sofa and flat screen they’d smuggled in when you were out.

Take for example, the case uncovered by researchers at a cybersecurity company called RSA. RSA was called in by a technology company in early 2014 to look at an unrelated security problem. The RSA guys quickly realized there was a much bigger one at hand: hackers were inside the company’s network. And had been, unnoticed, for six months.

Indeed, as the RSA team went through all the files and pieced together what had happened, they realised the attack went back even further.

For months the hackers — almost certainly from China — had probed the company’s defenses with software, until they found a small hole.

On July 10, 2013, they set up a fake user account at an engineering website. They loaded what is called malware — a virus, basically — to another a site. The trap was set. Now for the bait. Forty minutes later, the fake account sent emails to company employees, hoping to fool one into clicking on a link which in turn would download the malware and open the door.

Once an employee fell for the email, the hackers were in, and within hours were wandering the company’s network. For the next 50 days they mapped the network, sending their findings back to their paymasters. It would be they who would have the technical knowledge, not about hacking, but about what documents they wanted to steal.

Then in early September they returned, with specific targets. For weeks they mined the company’s computers, copying gigabytes of data. They were still at it when the RSA team discovered them nearly five months later.

Having pieced it all together, now the RSA team needed to kick the hackers out. But that would take two months, painstakingly retracing their movements, noting where they had been in the networks and what they had stolen. Then they locked all the doors at once.

Even then, the hackers were back within days, launching hundreds of assaults through backdoors, malware and webshells. They’re still at it, months later. They’re probably still at it somewhere near you too.