The Browser Doesn’t Matter So Long As It Goes to Google

The whole Google/Firefox issue is an interesting one: Google is the default search engine in Firefox because it pays to be there. The three-year deal expired in November 2011. Would they renew? Some thought no. They were wrong. Not only has Google renewed the deal whereby it effectively bankrolls Firefox, but it’s the first time …

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Dragon Tattoo: Mac or Vaio?

Some folk have suggested that because Sony is behind the new version of the Girl With the Dragon Tattoo all the product placements are Vaio: This would be a slap in the face of the original novel and the Swedish version, which stuck pretty closely to the text. But I’m not sure. Here’s another picture …

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Inside the Web of Things

This is a slightly longer version of a piece I’ve recorded for the BBC World Service I’ve long dreamed of an Internet of things, where all the stuff in my life speaks to each other instead of me having to the talking. The vision is relatively simple: each gadget is assigned an Internet address and …

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Podcast: Web of Things

The BBC World Service Business Daily version of my piece on The Web of Things to Come  (The Business Daily podcast is here.) Loose Wireless 122111 To listen to Business Daily on the radio, tune into BBC World Service at the following times, or click here. Australasia: Mon-Fri 0141*, 0741 East Asia: Mon-Fri 0041, 1441 …

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We’re Not in the Business of Understanding our User

A few years ago I wrote about sometimes your product is useful to people in ways you didn’t know—and that you’d be smart to recognise that and capitalize on itn (What Your Product Does You Might Not Know About, 2007). One of the examples I cited was ZoneAlarm, a very popular firewall that was bought …

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Podcast: True Video Lies

The BBC World Service Business Daily version of my piece on how video doesn’t always tell the truth. (The Business Daily podcast is here.) The piece it’s drawn from is here.  Loose Wireless 120711 To listen to Business Daily on the radio, tune into BBC World Service at the following times, or click here. Australasia: …

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True Video Lies

This is a longer version of a piece I recorded for the BBC World Service. The other day my wife lost her phone out shopping. We narrowed it down to either the supermarket or the taxi. So we took her shopping receipt to the supermarket and asked to see their CCTV to confirm she still …

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Carrier IQ’s Opt-Out Data Collection Patent

ZDNet writes here about an Carrier IQ patent that outlines keylogging and ability to target individual devices . Which is interesting. But Carrier IQ owns a dozen patents, including this one, which to me is much more interesting. This patent indicates what Carrier IQ software could do—not what it does—but it is revealing nonetheless: A …

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Carrier IQ Bits and Pieces

Some background about Carrier IQ before the hullabaloo started. People had found about this before Some in the industry questioned why such an expensive solution for a relatively simple problem Data was available to ‘market researchers’ Software was installed on modems too A lot of carriers were involved This is not new. Several people have …

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