Former Soviet Bloc, Allies, Under Lurid Attack

Trend Micro researchers David Sancho and Nart Villeneuve have written up an interesting attack they’ve dubbed LURID on diplomatic missions, government ministries, space-related government agencies and other companies and research institutions in the former Soviet bloc and its allies. (Only China was not a Soviet bloc member or ally in the list, and it was the least affected by the attack.)

Although they don’t say, or speculate, about the attacker, it’s not hard to conclude who might be particularly interested in what the attacks are able to dig up:

Although our research didn’t reveal precisely which data was being targeted, we were able to determine that, in some cases, the attackers attempted to steal specific documents and spreadsheets.

Russia had 1,063 IP addresses hit in the attacks; Kazakhstan, 325; Ukraine, 102; Vietnam, 93; Uzbekistan; 88; Belarus, 67; India, 66; Kyrgyzstan, 49; Mongolia, 42; and China, 39.

The campaign has been going for at least a year, and has infected some 1,465 computers in 61 countries with more than 300 targeted attacks.

Dark Reading quotes Jamz Yaneza, a research director at Trend Micro, as saying it’s probably a case of industrial espionage. But who by? ”This seems to be a notable attack in that respect: It doesn’t target Western countries or states. It seems to be the reverse this time,” Yaneza says.

Other tidbits from the Dark Reading report: Definitely not out of Russia, according to Yaneza. David Perry, global director of education at Trend Micro, says could be out of China or U.S., but no evidence of either. So it could be either hacktivists or industrial espionage. Yaneza says attackers stole Word files and spreadsheets, not financial information. “A lot of the targets seemed to be government-based,” he says.

My tuppennies’ worth? Seems unlikely to be hactivists, at least the type we think of. This was a concerted campaign, specifically aimed to get certain documents. Much more likely to be either industrial espionage or pure espionage. Which means we might have reached the stage where groups of hackers are conducting these attacks because a market exists for the product retrieved. Or had we already gotten there, and just not known it?

Either way, Russia and its former allies are now in the crosshairs.

More reading:

Massive malware attacks uncovered in former USSR | thinq_

Cyberspy attacks targeting Russians traced back to UK and US • The Register

Astroturfers Revisited

Good piece (video) by Jon Ronson about astroturfing:

Esc and Ctrl: Jon Ronson investigates astroturfing – video

In the second part of Jon Ronson’s series about the struggle for control of the internet, he looks at online astroturfing – when unpopular institutions post fake blogs to seem more favourable. He meets the former vice president of corporate communications for US healthcare company Cigna, who confirms his involvement in this kind of activity

He talks about the “death panels”: the Cigna whistleblower, Wendell Potter [Wikipedia] tells him that the company created lots of fake blogs and groups, all of which have since disappeared, including from archive.org, to get the issue going. Looking at a google search trend of the term “death panels”, you can see how it appears from nowhere so suddenly:

image

I’ve not seen an issue spring from nothing to the max quite like that for a while.

No question that we don’t really know just how widespread this is. It’s good that Ronson, whom I greatly admire, is on the case. Should be entertaining and revealing too.

Here’s some stuff I’ve written about this in the past:

The Real Conversation I’ve grown increasingly skeptical of the genuineness of this conversation: as PR gets wise, as (some) bloggers get greedy and (other) bloggers lose sight of, or fail to understand the need to maintain some ethicaleboundaries, the conversation has gotten skewed. I’m not alone in this, although cutting through to the chase remains hard. The current case of the Wal-Mart/Edelman thang, where the chain’s PR firm reportedly sponsored a blog about driving across America and turned it into a vehicle (sorry) to promote Wal-Mart, helps bring clarity to some issues, or at least to highlight the questions.

Social Media and Politics- Truthiness and Astroturfing Just how social is social media? By which I mean: Can we trust it as a measure of what people think, what they may buy, how they may vote? Or is it as easy a place to manipulate as the real world.

Podcast: The Tablet is the Future

The BBC World Service Business Daily version of my piece on the future of tablets.  (The Business Daily podcast is here.)   I’ll post the text itself at some point. 

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

To listen to Business Daily on the radio, tune into BBC World Service at the following times, or click here.

Australasia: Mon-Fri 0141*, 0741 

East Asia: Mon-Fri 0041, 1441 
South Asia: Tue-Fri 0141*, Mon-Fri 0741 
East Africa: Mon-Fri 1941 
West Africa: Mon-Fri 1541* 
Middle East: Mon-Fri 0141*, 1141* 
Europe: Mon-Fri 0741, 2132 
Americas: Tue-Fri 0141*, Mon-Fri 0741, 1041, 2132

Thanks to the BBC for allowing me to reproduce it as a podcast.

DigiNotar Breach Notes

Some folk have asked me for more details about the DigiNotar breach after my brief appearance on Al Jazeera this morning. So here are the notes I prepared for the segment. Links at the bottom.

Background

web security certificates are digital IDs issued by companies entrusted with making sure they are given to the right company or organisation. It allows a user to set up a secure connection between their computer and the organisation’s website. Browsers will show a little lock or some other icon to signify the certificate has been found and is trusted.

Hackers broke into a Dutch company called DigiNotar, itself owned by US firm Vasco Data Security, in mid June. DigiNotar is one of hundreds of companies around the globe called certificate authorities that issue these authentication certificates. Browsers contain a list of which CAs they can trust.

These hackers would have been able to steal existing certificates or generate their own, meaning they could now, with the help of an Internet Service Provider, launch what are called Man in the Middle Attacks–meaning they could intercept traffic, a bit like tapping a telephone.

DigiNotar noticed that something was amiss in July, but didn’t realise the extent of the breach until late August, by which time more than 500 (531) fake certificates were issued. While some cover domains like the CIA and MI6, these are probably just distractions. The key ones are a dozen issued for domains like Google, Facebook and Skype.

Why do we think this was about Iran?

Studies of the validation requests–browsers pinging DigiNotar to confirm the certificate’s authenticity–showed that during August the bulk–maybe 99%–of the traffic was coming from Iran. When the certificates were eventually revoked, Iranian activity dropped.

Moreover the attackers left some quite obvious clues. They left calling cards: transcribed Farsi which translates into slogans such as  ”I will sacrifice my life for my leader.” “unknown soldier”

Why might Iran be interested?

Well, we now know that a lot of countries like Syria intercept ordinary Internet traffic through something called Deep Packet Inspection. This means that the government is basically snooping on web traffic. But when that traffic passes through these secure connections, it’s much harder. So the holy grail of any internet surveillance is to get a hold  of those certificates, or work around them. This is a brazen attempt to do this.

All Internet traffic in Iran has to go through a government proxy, making this kind of attack much simpler. The government ISP just uses the certificate to pretend to be Google, or whatever, and then passes the traffic on.

Is it the government?

This is harder to confirm. The Dutch government is investigating this. A similar attack took place against an Italian CA in March, and it shows similar fingerprints.

But the fact that the certificates were stolen and then used seems to suggest some official connection.

What could they have discovered?

Quite a lot. All the traffic that was intercepted could be deciphered.. meaning all browsing and emails. But it also may have captured cookies, meaning passwords, which would have made it easy to hack into target accounts and sniff around old emails, dig out other passwords, or hack into associated accounts, such as Google Docs.

Moreover, some of the certificates compromise something called The Onion Router, a service which anonymizes web traffic. Though TOR itself wasn’t compromised the certificates could convince your browser you were talking to TOR, whereas in fact you’d be talking to the attacker.

Should other people be worried?

Yes, Some browser developers have been more forthcoming than others; Google Chrome and Firefox have been quick to respond. Others less so. If you’re in Iran or think you may be targetted, it’s a good idea to change your password, and to check that no one has altered your forwarding details in your email account. You should also upgrade your browser to the latest version, whatever browser you use.

DigiNotar made some horrible mistakes: one Windows domain for all certificate servers, no antivirus, a simple administrator password. There were defaced pages on the website dating back to 2009. One has to wonder what other certificate authorities are similarly compromised. We rely on these companies to know what they’re doing. They’re the top of the food chain, in the words of one analyst.

We should now be looking closely at the previous breaches and looking for others. This is a ratcheting up of the stakes in a cyberwar; this kind of thing has real world impact on those people who thought they were communicating safely and will now fear the knock on their door.

In the future this is likely to lead to a change in the way certificates are issued and checked. I don’t think DigiNotar is going to survive this, but I think a bigger issue is bound to be how this security issue is handled. I think governments which look to the Internet as a tool for democratic change need also to be aware of just how dangerous it is to encourage dissidents to communicate online, whether or not they’re being careful.

News:

BBC News – Fake DigiNotar web certificate risk to Iranians

DigiNotar – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Fake DigiNotar certificates targeting Iranians?

Expert reports/analysis:

DigiNotar Hacked by Black.Spook and Iranian Hackers – F-Secure Weblog : News from the Lab

Operation Black Tulip: Fox-IT’s report on the DigiNotar breach | Naked Security (Sophos)

Fox-IT report, operation Black Tulip (PDF)

VASCO:

Acquisition DigiNotar

VASCO DigiNotar Statement

Comodogate:

Comodo Group – Wikipedia, the free encyclopediaackground

web security certificates are digital IDs issued by companies entrusted with making sure they are given to the right company or organisation. It allows a user to set up a secure connection between their computer and the organisation’s website. Browsers will show a little lock or some other icon to signify the certificate has been found and is trusted.

 

Hackers broke into a Dutch company called DigiNotar, itself owned by US firm Vasco Data Security, in mid June. DigiNotar is one of hundreds of companies around the globe called certificate authorities that issue these authentication certificates. Browsers contain a list of which CAs they can trust.

 

These hackers would have been able to steal existing certificates or generate their own, meaning they could now, with the help of an Internet Service Provider, launch what are called Man in the Middle Attacks–meaning they could intercept traffic, a bit like tapping a telephone.

 

DigiNotar noticed that something was amiss in July, but didn’t realise the extent of the breach until late August, by which time more than 500 (531) fake certificates were issued. While some cover domains like the CIA and MI6, these are probably just distractions. The key ones are a dozen issued for domains like Google, Facebook and Skype.

 

Why do we think this was about Iran?

 

Studies of the validation requests–browsers pinging DigiNotar to confirm the certificate’s authenticity–showed that during August the bulk–maybe 99%–of the traffic was coming from Iran. When the certificates were eventually revoked, Iranian activity dropped.

 

Moreover the attackers left some quite obvious clues. They left calling cards: transcribed Farsi which translates into slogans such as  “I will sacrifice my life for my leader.” “unknown soldier”

 

Why might Iran be interested?

Well, we now know that a lot of countries like Syria intercept ordinary Internet traffic through something called Deep Packet Inspection. This means that the government is basically snooping on web traffic. But when that traffic passes through these secure connections, it’s much harder. So the holy grail of any internet surveillance is to get a hold  of those certificates, or work around them. This is a brazen attempt to do this.

 

All Internet traffic in Iran has to go through a government proxy, making this kind of attack much simpler. The government ISP just uses the certificate to pretend to be Google, or whatever, and then passes the traffic on.

 

Is it the government?

This is harder to confirm. The Dutch government is investigating this. A similar attack took place against an Italian CA in March, and it shows similar fingerprints.

 

What could they have discovered?

Quite a lot. All the traffic that was intercepted could be deciphered.. meaning all browsing and emails. But it also may have captured cookies, meaning passwords, which would have made it easy to hack into target accounts and sniff around old emails, dig out other passwords, or hack into associated accounts, such as Google Docs.

 

Moreover, some of the certificates compromise something called The Onion Router, a service which anonymizes web traffic. Though TOR itself wasn’t compromised the certificates could convince your browser you were talking to TOR, whereas in fact you’d be talking to the attacker.

 

Should other people be worried?

Yes, Some browser developers have been more forthcoming than others; Google Chrome and Firefox have been quick to respond. Others less so. If you’re in Iran or think you may be targetted, it’s a good idea to change your password, and to check that no one has altered your forwarding details in your email account. You should also upgrade your browser to the latest version, whatever browser you use.

 

DigiNotar made some horrible mistakes: one Windows domain for all certificate servers, no antivirus, a simple administrator password. There were defaced pages on the website dating back to 2009. One has to wonder what other certificate authorities are similarly compromised. We rely on these companies to know what they’re doing. They’re the top of the food chain, in the words of one analyst.

 

We should now be looking closely at the previous breaches and looking for others. This is a ratcheting up of the stakes in a cyberwar; this kind of thing has real world impact on those people who thought they were communicating safely and will now fear the knock on their door.

 

In the future this is likely to lead to a change in the way certificates are issued and checked. I don’t think DigiNotar is going to survive this, but I think a bigger issue is bound to be how this security issue is handled. I think governments which look to the Internet as a tool for democratic change need also to be aware of just how dangerous it is to encourage dissidents to communicate online, whether or not they’re being careful.

Real Phone Hacking

Interesting glimpse into the real world of phone hacking–not the amateurish stuff we’ve been absored by in the UK–by Sharmine Narwani: In Lebanon, The Plot Thickens « Mideast Shuffle.

First off, there’s the indictment just released by the Special Tribunal for Lebanon which, in the words of Narwani,

appears to be built on a simple premise: the “co-location” of cellular phones — traceable to the accused four — that coincide heavily with Hariri’s whereabouts and crucial parts of the murder plot in the six weeks prior to his death.

Indeed, the case relies heavily on Call Data Record (CDR) analysis. Which sounds kind of sophisticated. Or is it? Narwani contends that this could have been manufactured. Indeed, she says,

there isn’t a literate soul in Lebanon who does not know that the country’s telecommunications networks are highly infiltrated — whether by competing domestic political operatives or by foreign entities.

There is plenty of evidence to support this. The ITU recently issued two resolutions [PDF] basically calling on Israel to stop conducting “piracy, interference and disruption, and sedition”.

And Lebanon has arrested at least two men accused of helping Israel infiltrate the country’s cellular networks. What’s interesting about this from a data war point of view is that one of those arrested has confessed, according to Narwani, to lobbying for the cellular operator he worked for not to install more secure hardware, made by Huawei, which would have presumably made eavesdropping harder. (A Chinese company the good guy? Go figure.)

If this were the case–if Lebanon’s cellular networks were so deeply penetrated–then it’s evidence of the kind of cyberwar we’re not really equipped to understand, let alone deal with: namely data manipulation.

Narwani asks whether it could be possible that the tribunal has actually been hoodwinked by a clever setup: that all the cellular data was faked, when

a conspiring “entity” had to obtain the deepest access into Lebanese telecommunications networks at one or — more likely — several points along the data logging trail of a mobile phone call. They would have to be able to intercept data and alter or forge it, and then, importantly, remove all traces of the intervention.

After all, she says,

the fact is that Hezbollah is an early adherent to the concept of cyberwarfare. The resistance group have built their own nationwide fiber optics network to block enemy eavesdropping, and have demonstrated their own ability to intercept covert Israeli data communications. To imagine that they then used traceable mobile phones to execute the murder of the century is a real stretch.

Who knows? But Darwani asserts that

Nobody doubts Israel’s capacity to carry out this telecom sleight of hand — technology warfare is an entrenched part of the nation’s military strategies. This task would lie somewhere between the relatively facile telephone hacking of the News of the World reporters and the infinitely more complex Stuxnet attack on Iran’s nuclear facilities, in which Israel is a prime suspect.

In other words, there’s something going on here that is probably a lot more sophisticated than a tribunal can get behind. I’m no Mideast expert, but if only half of this is true it’s clear that cellphones are the weakest link in a communications chain. And that if this kind of thing is going on Lebanon, one has to assume that it’s going on in a lot of places.