Loose Wire: Bookmarks Are Dead. Long Live Bookmarks

Bookmarking, the act of marking a favorite website, has become a much more complicated matter these days. Here’s how to master the art of keeping tabs on the web By Jeremy Wagstaff A thought occurred to me the other day, as these things do. Who uses bookmarks anymore? Not the kind you put in books–although …

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How to Browse Securely

Nowadays most bad stuff lands on our computer when we’re browsing. Here’s how to stop it. By Jeremy Wagstaff Visit a dodgy website using Microsoft Windows XP or earlier and what’s called malware—a catchall term that ranges from code that pops up annoying ads at you to really bad stuff that turn your computer into …

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The Pitfalls of Facebook

Facebook just grew up and gave some of its users a shock they probably deserve. You might even have been one of them. You may have received a message from a friend already on Facebook; something that doesn’t sound like them, but hey, they might have been out partying when they wrote it: “have you …

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Some Early Lessons from The Georgian Cyberwar

illustration fron Arbor Networks There’s some interesting writing going about the Georgian Cyberwar. This from VNUnet, which seems to confirms my earlier suspicion that this was the first time we’re seeing two parallel wars:  “We are witnessing in this crisis the birth of true, operational cyber warfare,” said Eli Jellenc, manager of All-Source Intelligence at …

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Why Do People Contribute Stuff for Free?

By Jeremy Wagstaff If you want to see two worlds collide, introduce a Wikipedian to a bunch of journalists. I’ve been doing this quite a bit recently, partly for fun, and partly because I’ve decided a key part of training journalists to be ready for online media is understanding what they’re up against. “This is …

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Is PaperMaster Finally Dead?

A reader tells me that PaperMaster, the once great scanning and file saving software, is no longer available. Tech support, the reader says, says only that the product was pulled today and no other info is available.  Try to order one online and the message ‘531031 PaperMaster Pro International – not available’. A sad end …

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South Ossetia: The First Cyber/Physical War?

BBC picture Wikipedia is doing a good job of chronicling the war in South Ossetia; its mention of several apparent cyberattacks on both sides makes me wonder whether this is the first instance of a physical war being accompanied by a cyberwar? All those listed on Wikipedia are not parallel attacks, i.e. they are not …

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Six Degrees of Networking

A recent report by Microsoft researchers had breathed life back into something that looked like a myth: the idea that we’re only six people away from everyone on the planet. Six Degrees of separation, as it’s called, suggested that someone we knew would know someone else who would know someone else who would know someone …

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Old Content Still Gets Readers Excited

Here’s evidence that online publications should try to re-use—and make accessible—old content. The most emailed story on the BBC website at the moment—Aug 5 2008—is actually a story from January 2004: which is this one: I have no idea why it is—although the subject matter is pretty compelling, I must admit. (The gadget, it turns …

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