Fake Photos-A Thing of the Past?

image from WSJ.com You may have already heard about the Chinese antelope that weren’t: This, from WSJ’s Jane Spencer and Juliet Ye: Earlier this week, Xinhua, China’s state-run news agency, issued an unusual public apology for publishing a doctored photograph of Tibetan wildlife frolicking near a high-speed train. The deception — uncovered by Chinese Internet …

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The New Newswire: a Dutch Student Called Michael

Twitter is now a news service in its own right. ReadWrite Web, an excellent website dedicated to Web 2.0 stuff, points out that the recent earthquake in England–not that unusual in itself, apparently, but rarely actually strong enough to be felt by humans—was reported first by Twitterers and by a Twitter-only news service called BreakingNewsOn …

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Beyond Information Delivery

Newspaper delivery guy, Jakarta 2007 Over at Loose Wire sister site ten minutes I just wrote a review of ShifD, a new Web 2.0 clippings service that works, in theory, between desktop and mobile. More interesting, I reckoned (quoting myself; sorry), is that it’s developed by two guys from within The New York Times’ R&D …

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SMS, Toilets, Bike Theft and Cars

I remember an instructive conversation with a guy who developed services for the mobile phone. I was suggesting some fancy service or other that involved a small app sitting on the phone. He said it wouldn’t fly with users. “No downloads, no registration, keep it simple,” he said. “Or it won’t stick.” Maybe that’s why …

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Breaking Out of Those Silos

If you’re looking for the future of news, a pretty good example of it is at UK startup silobreaker, which isn’t a farm demolition service but a pretty cool news aggregation and visualization site. In other words, it lets you look at news in different ways. And it’s caught the attention of Microsoft, who today …

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Demise of Contemplative Space

Demise of Contemplative Space Originally uploaded by Loose Wire. Now there are TVs on buses, in lifts, in waiting rooms, is there any room left for contemplation? In tandem with my earlier musings about the demise of downtime, we’re seeing those places that once, by accident or design, encouraged pondering, mulling, whatever you want to …

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Dark Age Messengers

Maybe I’m missing something, of I’ve been taken in by those TV ads of guys walking across stepping stones made out of frogmens’ skulls, but I expect the big couriers to be somewhat snappier and higher-tech these days. Not based on today’s experience: Call their hotline to get a guy in either Mexico or the …

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Tony’s Camera

Tony’s Camera Originally uploaded by Loose Wire. How many people, I wonder, have had this experience: a nightmare with a smartphone and a return to trusty basics. My friend Tony has a BlackBerry, but this is his phone of choice, and after his N91 died in midflight (literally) he decided he wouldn’t take a chance …

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Reflecting On Yourself

Reflecting On Yourself Originally uploaded by Loose Wire. Why are people so easily absorbed by their own reflection? Is it narcissism, or do we tend to face the transport that we await? Is it easier to look at ourselves than at other people? Are people thinking about themselves when they look, or are they critically …

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How Reliable Is Google Maps?

Was looking for a Singapore hotel this morning on Google Maps, which would seem to be a good place to start, and was perturbed to find it flagged in five different places, most of them several streets apart (above). These are all links from companies advertising rooms. So you’d think they would try to get …

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