Yahoo Grabs Oddpost

I hate people who quote themselves, but here goes: A few months back I wrote in my column about how “eventually, RSS will replace e-mail. Or rather, it will dovetail with e-mail so that it appears in the same place, in the same program, so you can read Aunt Edna’s newsletter as well as the news feed of your favourite football team.” I also mentioned a great little program/service called Oddpost, which I said came closest to this ideal: “One great example of this is Oddpost, a subscription e-mail service that folds nearly all of what I’ve just outlined into one place, from RSS feeds to your Web mail accounts.”

Well, for once it seems I may have not been too far off the mark. Last week Yahoo! bought Oddpost for an undisclosed sum. The folks at Oddpost write that “from this day forward, we’ll be working on a new, advanced Yahoo! Mail product (one that, in press release terms, might be described as “a powerful combination of our award-winning web application technology with the world’s #1 Internet brand and email service”)”.

Unfortunately new users won’t be able to sign up for Oddpost in the meantime, but this represents a significant move for the whole merger of Blogs/email/RSS. In part, of course, it’s Yahoo playing desperate catch-up with Google over Gmail and search. But it may end up as more than that. As Iam Bumpa puts it: “This is about RIAs (rich internet apps), integrated web services and open standards being fused with productivity software, micro-content and social networking and offered as hosted experiences.” In short, putting lots of different bits and pieces in one place that you can really control, and access from anywhere. Think of it as MyYahoo! but one that doesn’t look like something out of the mid 1990s.

12. July 2004 by jeremy
Categories: Blogs | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 comment

One Comment

  1. Once again, Yahoo has shown it would rather buy, than build.

    GeoCities
    Broadcast.com
    HotJobs
    Muse.Net

    Yahoo buys assets that can fit into an integrated AOL killer platform that is all Web based.

    Yahoo’s approach of really being platform agnostic is quite plainly seen. They want to be the browsers destination. While many other companies seek to be anti-Microsoft, Yahoo takes a position of “well if it works on Windows, how do we make it work with everything else.”

    With the Oddpost acquisition, Yahoo has once again said, “we don’t care what platform you use, as long as you use Yahoo.”

    Smart. Very smart.